What about Dental Floss?

Did you ever think about where dental floss came from or when it was invented?

According to Wikipedia…

Levi Spear Parmly, a dentist from New Orleans, is credited with inventing the first form of dental floss. In 1819, he recommended running a waxen silk thread “through the interstices of the teeth, between their necks and the arches of the gum, to dislodge that irritating matter which no brush can remove and which is the real source of disease.” He considered this the most important part of oral care. Floss was not commercially available until 1882, when the Codman and Shurtleft company started producing unwaxed silk floss. in 1898, the Johnson & Johnson Corporation received the first patent for dental floss that was made from the same silk material used by doctors for silk stitches.

Nylon floss was developed during World War II by Dr Charles C Bass. He found it to be better than silk because of its texture which was more resistant and that it could be produced in various lengths and sizes.

Today, variety of dental flosses are available. Waxed, unwaxed monofilaments and multifilaments are most popular. Thicknesses and widths vary. Some waxed types of dental floss are said to contain antibacterial agents.

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No matter what type or size of floss you choose, it’s important to floss once a day before or after brushing to allow the fluoride from the toothpaste to reach between the teeth.

 

 

Show the Love

Our patients are wonderful people! Here are some of the recent comments they made concerning their visit…  Enjoy!

Dr. Brogdon has been my dentist for over 20 years and I feel lucky to have him and his staff taking care of my dental needs. He keeps up with the latest techniques and always answers any questions I may have in a clear manner.  Thomas G.

I’ve been going to Dr. Brogdon’s office for many years! Dr. Brogdon, Bethany, and Tina are amazingnous! I highly recommend them for ALL of your dental needs. They are so warm, friendly, kind, compassionate, and “baby” you when necessary. I LOVE you guys! Thank you so much for being who you are & for being the VERY BEST dentist in Chattanooga! Signed: A very Happy, Healthy, & Pretty SMILE

I’ve been going to Brogdon Dental since moving to Chattanooga 24 years ago. I picked them out of the phone book because they were close to home and feel that I lucked out tremendously which is why I’ve never changed dental professionals ever since. I’ve had fillings as well as crowns over the years and have never, ever had a problem. The staff has always been wonderful, approachable and appreciative of our (my husband goes here too) business. I’ve never felt more confident that our dental needs will successfully be met with Dr. Brogdon and Angela (our hygienist) . He keeps up with all new techniques and advances in dentistry. If Brogdon Dental weren’t top notch, we wouldn’t have stuck with them for 24 years even though now we live some distance away.  Evelyn G.

Enjoyed my office visit. Very helpful and courteous staff. Wait time was minimal. Office is very clean and over all service I would rate 5 out of 5.  Karen L.

No waiting…..prompt…..no pain…..efficient and extremely courteous !! Still Love Brogden Dental…..over 20 years now…..!!!  Billy M.

This is just a sampling of the great comments we receive.  If you haven’t given us a try, why not call our office today?  We have great dentists, hygienists and office staff waiting to serve you.  Brogdon Dental 423-870-5698  Dr. Joseph Brogdon and Dr. Joshua McKinney.  Show the love!

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March – National Nutrition Month

We know that in order to have proper nutrition, we need to eat a well balanced diet.  If you don’t give your body the nutrients it needs, your health as well as your mouth, may suffer. The first step in the digestion process begins with your mouth, teeth and gums.  Properly chewing your food goes a long way in making sure you get what you need.  A poor diet can lead to tooth decay and gum disease.  High carbs and sugary foods contribute to the production of plaque which will cause cavities.

Here are a few useful tips courtesy of MouthHealthy.org, the ADA’s consumer website:

  • Follow the recommended nutritional guidelines. Your individual nutrition and calorie needs depend on your age, gender, level of physical activity and other health factors. However, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a balanced and healthy diet should include fruits and vegetables; grains, especially whole grains such as oatmeal, brown rice and whole wheat bread; low-fat or fat-free dairy foods; and lean protein choices.
  • Stay away from foods that harm your dental health. Empty calorie foods such as candy, sweets and snack foods are a cause for dental concern, not only because they offer no nutritional value, but because the amount and type of sugar that they contain can adhere to teeth. The bacteria in your mouth feed off these sugars, releasing acids, which can lead to tooth decay. In addition, sugar-containing drinks — soda, lemonade, juice and sweetened coffee or tea — are particularly harmful because sipping them causes a constant sugar bath over teeth, which promotes tooth decay.
  • Eat foods that benefit dental health. Cheese, milk, plain yogurt, calcium-fortified tofu, leafy greens and almonds are foods that may benefit tooth health thanks to their high amounts of calcium and other nutrients they provide. Protein-rich foods like meat, poultry, fish, milk and eggs are good sources of phosphorus, which along with calcium, plays a critical role in dental health by protecting and rebuilding tooth enamel. In addition, fruits and vegetables are high in water and fiber, which balance the sugars they contain and help to clean the teeth.

If you have any questions concerning your dental health and the part good nutrition plays, give us a call at Brogdon Dental 423-870-5698. We welcome the opportunity to discuss your dental needs.

Oral Health and Body Health

There is a relationship between our teeth, gum and body. Our body is considered an ecosystem and our mouth is the main entrance to it. What goes through our mouths and into our body determines many of the diseases we contract.

Each tooth is surrounded by gums that create a seal that controls the bacteria that enters our body. If we fail to take care of this seal, and allow it to be weakened, we open the door for all kinds of things to enter our bloodstream causing a myriad of problems.

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According to OraGuard, Ltd, listed below are of some diseases that we can develop as a result of bacteria entering the body through the mouth and gums:

 

  • IBS
    Oral bacteria can enter the bloodstream and attack the friendly bacteria in your gut. And that’s when your digestive issues begin to worsen.
  • Breast cancer
    Women may be 11 times more likely to develop breast cancer due to lack of good oral care.
  • Prostate cancer
    Research has shown that men with indicators of periodontal disease and prostatitis have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of these conditions.
  • Diabetes
    Serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes.
  • Weight gain
    Oral health, diabetes, and obesity are intertwined and inflammation is at the core of  this complex interaction
  • Alzheimer’s and dementia
    Research shows gum disease bacteria lipopolysaccharides (the surface of the bacterium) in samples from people suffering from dementia and none of the people who do not have the condition.
  • Cardiovascular disease including stroke, heart attack, infective endocarditis, and thickening of the arteries
    When bacteria reach the heart, they can attach themselves to any damaged area and cause inflammation.
  • Low birthweight and premature birth
    Periodontal health also plays a key role in a healthy pregnancy. Research suggests that pregnant women with gum disease are at higher risk for pre-term and low birth weight deliveries.
  • Bacterial pneumonia
    Bacterial infections in the chest are believed to be caused by breathing droplets from the mouth and throat into the lungs.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
    Those who had moderate to severe periodontitis had more than twice the risk of RA compared to those with mild or no periodontitis

We don’t realize how important our oral health is in relation to a healthy body, but we need to think about not only what we put in our mouths, but how we take care of our mouths, which includes our teeth and gums. Good oral health is not only brushing your teeth and visiting your dentist, but don’t forgot to do this as well.

Contact our office at Brogdon Dental to set up your cleaning today.

 

 

The end is near…

… of the year 2016 that is. Time is running our for you to utilize your dental benefits.  Call us today to schedule an appointment at 423-870-5698.  We are in the network with BCBS, Cigna, United Healthcare and Delta Dental. Schedule an appointment today with Dr. Brogdon or Dr. McKinney and don’t let your benefits go unused. 2017 will be here before you know it!   www.brogdondentalpc.com

 

 

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Is Sugar Scary? It can be…

Halloween is here and that means your kids will probably be eating a lot of sweets, especially candy. So how can you keep their teeth from suffering after too much sugar?

One way is pretty simple. Brush often. Everyone knows that brushing your teeth can help you prevent cavities, but it can also help if you have eaten too much sugar. You also need to change your toothbrush out often. According to colgate.com, Toothbrushes with triple-action bristles and diamond-shaped heads are designed to be better at cleaning hard-to-reach nooks and crannies.  And those hard-to-reach places are where your sugars will reside.

Use mouthwash, especially those that contain fluoride. If you don’t have mouthwash, swishing your mouth out with plain water will help.

Chewing sugar-free gum after eating sweets helps by creating saliva which will remove sugar that coats your teeth. The key is to prevent the mouth from remaining coated in the acid-forming sugars and other carbohydrates found in sweets after eating.

Use these tips to help your kids (and yourself) from developing cavities from too much sugars.  And call our office at Brogdon Dental to make your appointment for cleaning. Now is the time to take control of your and your children’s dental health.

One Reason for Dental Cleaning

There are many reasons to see your dentist for dental cleanings and its not just to keep your smile looking bright. One of those reasons could be your breath.

Some of the causes of bad breath include:

  • Food We Eat 
  • Infrequent Brushing and Flossing
  • Oral Diseases and Infections
  • Dry Mouth
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Medical Conditions

Some of the things you can do to prevent bad breath is to brush and floss at least two times a day, especially after a meal that contains foods that are known to cause bad breath. Also consider the use of a tongue scraper. Rinse thoroughly with water or mouthwash afterwards.

If your bad breath is caused by smoking, take steps to stop. This can also help combat periodontal disease. If you experience dry mouth, try sipping water throughout the day and during meals. Chew sugar-free gum or dissolve sugar-free candy in your mouth to help produce more saliva.

Gum, mints, mouthwashes and breath sprays are just temporary measures to mask your bad breath. Make sure that you call our office at Brogdon Dental to schedule an appointment for a complete examination of your teeth and gums and a thorough cleaning by our hygienist. We recommend you visit our office every six months for routine cleaning.