May is National Smile Month

May 16th begins National Smile Month, a national campaign to promote good oral health in children and adults. Here are some key points from nationalsmilemonth.org to maintain a health smile:

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and on at least one other occasion with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks.
  • Visit your dentist regularly.
  • Change your toothbrush every two to three months or sooner if it becomes worn.
  • Clean in between your teeth at least once a day using floss.
  • If you are nervous about visiting the dentist, make sure they are aware of why so they can improve your treatment.

A great smile can improve your self-confidence, create a positive mind set and can change not only your mouth, but your body too.

BeauBrogdon

We at Brogdon Dental want you to get your smile on. Call us today to make an appointment.

 

 

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss and a Fork 6

This month we will discuss number 6 in our list of 12 beneficial foods for healthier teeth and smiles, Vitamin C-Rich Fruits and Veggies. In order to build strong gum tissue, you need a diet that includes plenty of fruits and vegetables, especially those with a high vitamin C content.

According to research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), people who consume less than 60 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C per day had nearly 1-1/2 times more risk of developing severe gingivitis than those who took in 180 mg a day – the same amount you’d find in a half cup of guava. 

A cup of raw broccoli or half a cantaloupe has 75 mg of vitamin C, nearly a full day’s minimum requirement for women (the Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) is 85 mg for women 19 and older).

Do you smoke? Then, you’ll need 35 mg more vitamin C per day to ward off gingivitis, because cigarettes reduce vitamin C levels in the blood, according to a 2000 study by the State University of New York at Buffalo, published in the Journal of Periodontology.

melon

Vitamin C helps prevent gingivitis, which is a disease that caused gums to swell, become red and bleed and eventually leads to tooth loss. Call us at Brogdon Dental today for a check up to see if you might be suffering from gingivitis and find our what we can do to help. In the meantime, eat your melon!

The Heart of the Matter

Since February is National Heart Month, we wanted to review the relationship between heart disease and gum disease.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death in North America and gum disease affects 46 percent of the population.  Gum disease, also known as Gingivitis or Periodontitis, is caused by bacteria that grows on the teeth under the gums. Studies show that patients with gum disease are at a higher risk for heart disease.

According to Science Daily, A University of Florida study shows that the same bacteria that cause gum disease also promotes heart disease — a discovery that could change the way heart disease is diagnosed and treated.

Understanding the importance of treating gum disease in patients with heart disease will lead to future studies and recommendations for careful attention to oral health in order to protect patients against heart disease

Brushing teeth twice a day and flossing at least once a day is recommended. Teeth should be professionally cleaned every six months.

At Brogdon Dental, we want to protect your smile as well as your heart.  Make your appointment today for your teeth cleaning. Your heart and your family will thank you.

The Daily Grind – Bruxism

Do you sometimes find yourself clinching your teeth, or do you grind your teeth in your sleep? Maybe you wake up in the morning with a dull headache or jaw soreness with pain in your face that you can’t explain.  If you’ve experienced any of these problems you may be suffering from a condition known as Bruxism or more commonly known as teeth grinding.

According to www.colgate.com – Bruxism is clenching or grinding your teeth. Most people are not even aware that they are doing this. In the United States, bruxism affects about 30 million to 40 million children and adults.

In adults, most cases of bruxism are caused by stress and anxiety.  Other causes are sleep disorders, crooked or missing teeth or an abnormal bite.  If you are suffering from stress and anxiety, find ways to help relax. Light exercise such as taking a walk or listening to calming music may help.  About 30% of children grind or clench their teeth and most of them eventually outgrow this and suffer no permanent damage.

If  bruxism in adults or children is related to dental problems, a more thorough examination may be needed.  As well as checking your “bite” (how your upper and lower teeth come together) Dr Brogdon will examine your teeth and gums for damage and may take x-rays of your jaws and teeth.  He may have to adjust your teeth alignment.

Ask Dr Brogdon about fitting you for a mouthguard (a dental appliance) that you can wear at night to help protect your teeth while you sleep.  In some cases this may be all you need.

We live in a stressful world.  Call us today at 423-870-5698 and let us at Brogdon Dental help relieve a little of your daily grind!

Tooth Whitening – Is it for me?

Who doesn’t want a nice, white smile?  There are many products on the market to help improve your looks. While many people are pleased with the results the get from brushing twice daily, flossing between the teeth and regular visits to their dentist for cleanings, some are interested in a brighter smile.

As with any dental procedure, you should start by talking to your dentist and seeking their advise as to what would be best for you.  According to the American Dental Association’s website,

“Whiteners may not correct all types of discoloration. For example, yellowish hued teeth will probably bleach well, brownish-colored teeth may bleach less well, and grayish-hued teeth may not bleach well at all. Likewise, bleaching may not enhance your smile if you have had bonding or tooth-colored fillings placed in your front teeth. The whitener will not affect the color of these materials, and they will stand out in your newly whitened smile. In these cases, you may want to investigate other options, like porcelain veneers or dental bonding.”

Tooth whitening falls under the category of cosmetic dentistry and Dr. Brogdon, a cosmetic dentist,  is highly qualified to perform cosmetic procedures that will benefit the appearance and health of your teeth.  Contact our office to see what we can do to help you have the dazzling smile you want.

Are You Brushing your Teeth too Often or Hard?

Are you brushing your teeth too often or too hard?  According to WebMD you could be damaging your teeth if you do either one.

“While brushing your teeth three times a day is ideal, more may not be, says Michael Sesemann, DDS, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. “More than four toothbrushings a day would begin to seem compulsive,” he says.

Excessive brushing could expose the root of the tooth to irritation, and that could in turn irritate the gums. Brushing vigorously can also erode tooth enamel. The trick is to brush very gently for two to three minutes.”

Softly brushing your teeth at least twice a day is recommended, ”Three times a day is best,” Sesemann says. With too much time between brushings, he says, bacterial plaque will build up, boosting the risk of gum inflammation and other problems.”

Check back for more “tooth brushing mistakes” and how to correct them.

Would You Like a Mint?

Everyone has bad breath now and then. Some of us more often than others. The technical name for bad breath is halitosis, and most of the time it is a temporary condition. Some foods, alcoholic drinks, coffee, tooth decay, dry mouth and certain medical conditions are all common causes of halitosis.

There are very few people in the world who cannot identify with having “morning breath.” Most of us wake up in the morning with bad breath because while we sleep bacteria multiply in the mouth. Simply brushing your teeth will take care of morning breath, as it will take care of about 90% of cases of bad breath.

Eating foods like garlic, onions, some cheeses, fish and coffee will also cause bad breath. If you are worried about having halitosis due to a meal or your day to day diet, you should consider carrying a small dental care kit – a toothbrush, paste, and mouthwash. If bad breath is a problem, make sure to clean your tongue when you brush.

Other tips to help you avoid the embarrassment of bad breath include sipping water frequently to keep the mouth moist and chewing sugarless gum for the same reason. Be sure to replace your toothbrush every two to three months, floss regularly and see Dr. Brogdon at least every six months for a thorough cleaning.

Regular dental care is vital to avoid bad breath because, following diet, tooth decay is the second leading cause of halitosis. Having your teeth cleaned every six months will help to insure that your teeth and gums stay healthy.

A few people suffer from chronic or persistent halitosis, which is often caused by an underlying medical condition such as diabetes, GERD, bronchitis or sinusitis. In those cases, seeking treatment for the underlying condition along with good dental care from Dr. Brogdon will help you overcome having frequent bad breath.

Finally, a small segment of the population, .5-1%, suffer from halitophobia, or delusional halitosis. People with halitophobia believe they have bad breath, but have not asked for an objective opinion. As with other phobias, the fear of bad breath can severely impact a person’s life.