K is for Kindness

Many people take their teeth for granted, especially when we’re younger. We think we will always have our teeth and don’t think much about them, until they start to hurt.  Then they get our attention! But we should be treating our teeth with kindness at an early age.  One way to be kind to our teeth is by how we brush.

Experts recommend brushing your teeth in little circles, going around until you have covered every surface of every tooth. You also need to brush up and down, rather than side to side.  You will also need to keep your teeth clean in between each tooth by flossing.  This is recommend once daily.  This helps remove particles that can get stuck between your teeth after eating.

You will need a soft toothbrush and use fluoride toothpaste, brushing at least twice a day and especially before bedtime.

Make your appointment to see us at Brogdon Dental for your semi annual teeth cleaning to keep your teeth in top shape.

Be kind to your teeth now and they will be with you for a long time!

 

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A New Year – Goodbye to 2018

As we approach another new year, we look back on 2018 with thankfulness for all of our family and friends and all the things that happened during those 12 months. The good, the bad and the wonderful!

 

Through it all we would like to especially thank all our patients for using our services this year.  We wouldn’t be here without your support and we at Brogdon Dental just want to wish all of you a fantastic 2019 and remember… Keep Smiling!

We look forward to our continued relationship and seeing you all soon.

HNY2016

G is for Gingivitis

Last month we learned that Flossing was more than just a dance. This month we are going to learn about Gingivitis. So what is Gingivitis? When plaque, which contains bacteria, builds up on teeth it creates an inflammation of the surrounding gum tissue. This gum disease is know as Gingivitis.

Left unchecked, gingivitis can develop into a more severe form of gum disease, known as Periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. In fact, 75% of Americans will experience gum disease at some point in their life.  It is also the number one cause of bleeding gums in adults.

gingivitis-symptoms

According to crest.com here are some steps to help prevent, if you don’t already have gingivitis, or to treat it if you do:

  • Use an anti-gingivitis toothpaste.
  • Use an anti-gingivitis mouthwash.
  • Brush your teeth and gums for at least 2 minutes, at least 2 times a day.
  • Floss at least once a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every 3 months: Worn-out bristles remove less plaque.
  • If you have sore gums after flossing or brushing, or notice bleeding, don’t stop brushing or flossing. Use a toothbrush with soft bristles so you don’t hurt your gums.  If you notice bleeding regularly, see your dentist.
  • Check your gums in the mirror often for changes in color or texture. If their appearance changes, see your dentist and hygienist.
  • Cut back on foods that are high in sugar. Sugar promotes the growth of gingivitis-causing plaque.

If you feel that you may have gingivitis or even periodontitis, please call call our office at Brogdon Dental as soon as possible so we can begin the process of reversing the problem and restoring healthy gums again.

 

 

F is for Floss

Floss! Is flossing important? Sure it is! Using floss (which is a thin piece of string, usually waxed) between your teeth can help remove food particles and plaque from in between teeth and around your gum line. There are places that your toothbrush just can’t reach and that’s where flossing comes in.

It is recommended that you floss once a day, at bedtime, to help remove what you haven’t been able to do with your toothbrush.  It is really more important than brushing alone.

There are various types of “floss” you can use if you don’t want to use the traditional string floss.  “Dental Flossers” look like a toothpick with a bristled end.  Interdental brushes which are thin, round or cone-shaped, these brushes have a small head with bristles held on by wire and a Water Flosser, which is an oral health appliance designed to removed plaque by the use of jet stream water, such as a WaterPic.

What ever you decide to use, the key is continual use every day. By finding the method best for you, you will be more apt to floss on a daily basis and that’s what’s important.

smallfloss

 

 

E is for Enamel

Have you ever wondered about your tooth enamel. What is it? Should you protect it? Is it important?

Enamel is the hardest material in your body.  It covers the outer layer of your tooth and is what you see when you look at your teeth.   Enamel is made up mostly of minerals, primarily hydroxyapatite.  Hydroxyapatite is defined as a natural calcium mineral and  an essential ingredient of normal bone and teeth. It can be various colors from light yellow to a grayish white.

Enamel is very important in protecting your teeth from decay, so it’s important to do all you can to keep your enamel from eroding.  It helps protect your teeth from sensitive things, such as hot and cold foods or beverages.

Your body cannot make more enamel to replace it if it is destroyed. Enamel does not contain any living cells, so unlike your bones, cannot regenerate. That’s why it’s important to do all you can to protect it.

Avoiding hard candies or those with lots of sugar and high acidic foods are a couple of ways to help.  Also, regular brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing, and visiting Dr. Brogdon for regular cleanings and check ups.

 

C is for Crowns

A crown is a tooth shaped cap used to cover the tooth. It is used to restore the size, shape and strength of the tooth and to improve its appearance.  Once it is cemented in place, it will cover the entire tooth from the gum line.

In some cases a root canal will be required first, especially if the tooth is badly decayed or infected.  During the root canal, the nerve and the pulp are removed and the inside the tooth is cleaned and sealed which will prepare it for the crown.

At Brogdon Dental we offer crowns that can be made in one visit.  With innovative CEREC technology, we can create custom crowns, inlays, and onlays in about an hour. This means that in just one visit, you can get a custom-made, all-white, reliable restoration. No temporary. No follow-up visit. It’s that simple.

 

 

A is for Anxiety

Do you dread going to the Dentist? Does your palms start to sweat and your heart starts beating faster when you walk in the door?  Do you find yourself avoiding making an appointment because of your fears?  If this describes you, you are not alone.  Somewhere between 9% and 20% of Americans avoid going to the dentist because of anxiety or fear.

According to WebMD here are some of the most common reasons for dental anxiety:

  • Fear of pain. Fear of pain is a very common reason for avoiding the dentist. This fear usually stems from an early dental experience that was unpleasant or painful or from dental “pain and horror” stories told by others. Thanks to the many advances in dentistry made over the years, most of today’s dental procedures are considerably less painful or even pain-free.
  • Fear of injections or fear the injection won’t work. Many people are terrified of needles, especially when inserted into their mouth. Beyond this fear, others fear that the anesthesia hasn’t yet taken effect or wasn’t a large enough dose to eliminate any pain before the dental procedure begins.
  • Fear of anesthetic side effects. Some people fear the potential side effects of anesthesia such as dizziness, feeling faint, or nausea. Others don’t like the numbness or “fat lip” associated with local anesthetics.
  • Feelings of helplessness and loss of control. It’s common for people to feel these emotions considering the situation — sitting in a dental chair with your mouth wide open, unable to see what’s going on.
  • Embarrassment and loss of personal space. Many people feel uncomfortable about the physical closeness of the dentist or hygienist to their face. Others may feel self-conscious about the appearance of their teeth or possible mouth odors.

If you suffer from any of these anxieties, the best thing you can do is talk about your fears with Dr Brogdon. He can discuss ways to make you feel less stressed and more comfortable.  Ask him to explain all he is doing, when he is doing it.  Knowing what to expect can help you relax. If you have any pain or just need to catch your breath, you might raise your hand or give him some signal to stop what he’s doing.

Dental Anxiety doesn’t have to keep you from having the best smile possible.  We are here to help.  Give us a call and set up that appointment.  Don’t be one of those 20%.