The Pain of Wisdom Teeth

There are many different causes for dental pain… tooth decay,  a fracture or abscess, a broken or damaged filling, gum infections or wisdom teeth pain.  If you still have your wisdom teeth, you may be experiencing this unique pain.  How do you know?  As wisdom teeth come in they can be very painful.  Many times they grow in crooked or sideways.  They can push on other teeth causing more pain.

The area around the gum can become inflamed or red and tender to the touch. You might even see them poking out from the gum. Some people don’t experience any pain at all.  Most dentist recommend removal before they start to create problems.

But what about impacted wisdom teeth? This occurs when wisdom teeth are prevented from coming out because of being blocked by the jaw bone or other teeth.

According to crest.com …Impacted wisdom teeth are more difficult to remove, leave you at greater risk for complications from surgery, and can permanently damage bones and other teeth. Also, the longer wisdom teeth pain persists, the more likely it is that an infection will result from bacteria entering open tissue. Oral infections can have a negative impact on general systemic health…

If you think your pain could be from your wisdom teeth, call our office today. We will be able to tell you after an examination if your pain is from your wisdom teeth, and what you need to do next.

Be wise! Don’t let the pain of wisdom teeth go on longer than it needs to.

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Take your vitamins…

How many times did you hear your mother say, “Did you take your vitamins?”  I know as a kid my Mom would say this to me every morning before school as she would dole out our Flintstone vitamins. But seriously, vitamins do play a major role in our health, but did you know that certain vitamins can help with your dental health?  Doctors have found that Calcium and Vitamin D not only help your bones but can help strengthen your teeth as well.

According to WebMD… “If you’re supplementing your diet with calcium and vitamin D to prevent bone loss, you may be more likely to hang onto your pearly whites, according to a report from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Toronto.”

To explore the role of supplementation on tooth retention, the researchers followed more than 140 older adults for five years. Participants took either a placebo or 500 mg of calcium plus 700 units of vitamin D daily for three years. Both during and after the trial, their teeth were examined periodically.

For those who took supplements, the likelihood of losing one or more teeth was 40% less, even two years later. Tooth loss was also linked to the number of cavities, frequency of flossing, and use of thiazide diuretics, a type of medication that helps lower blood pressure.

Adding vitamins like calcium and vitamin D to your morning regime can not only help you feel better and have stronger bones, but can help save your teeth.

Be sure not to overdo though. The recommended upper limits are 2,500 mg a day for calcium and 1,000 units a day for vitamin D. Any more than that could be toxic. Be sure to check with your doctor if you take more than the recommended amount.

And don’t forget to brush and floss daily as well. Your Mom would be proud!

 

Dehydration and Oral Health

Although summer may be coming to a close, temperatures continue to soar in to the upper 90’s. The end of summer has many students heading back to school.  With the beginning of the new school year brings the start of high school athletics. Many kids will participate in practices, especially football, in the late afternoon heat after classes. The need to maintain adequate hydration is essential, especially considering the many problems it can cause. Failure to drink enough fluids before physical activity can result in serious issues.

One of the first warning signs of dehydration is dry mouth.  You may find that you have trouble swallowing, and others may notice that you have bad breath, which is one of the problems associated with a dry mouth.  If your mouth is not producing enough saliva it can become an breeding ground for bacteria. This bacteria causes infections that may lead to cavities and gingivitis.

We need sufficient saliva in our mouths to wash away food debris and reduce plaque, which is why severe tooth decay and gum disease can occur if dry mouth is left untreated. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, 30 percent of all tooth decay in older adults is caused by dry mouth. (www.toothwisdom.org)

Besides drinking plenty of water and brushing and flossing daily; chewing sugar free gum or sucking on sugar free mints can help fight dry mouth since they stimulates saliva production. Products that contain xylitol (a sugar substitute) can actually help prevent cavities.

As the temperatures still continue to rise, keep a check on your hydration. If you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated. Experts recommend at least a gallon (eight 8-ounce glasses) of water per day. Dehydration effects every part of your body including your oral health. Keep drinking water.

Time…

“In the nick of Time… All in good Time…Only a matter of Time…Time will tell…Time Flies…” We’ve all heard these catch phases concerning time.  In the busy world we live in, it just seems that we have so little of it and our days fly by in a rush.  We look around us and wondered where the time went.

We at Brogdon Dental realize how important your time is to you. Because of that, we have added forms on our website for all our new patients to download, print and fill out before their scheduled appointment.

Visit our website at www.brogdondentalpc.com and scroll down until you see our list of patient forms. We have created these in a PDF format for your convenience.

We look forward to your visit and hope you will have the “time of your life”!

 

The Heart of the Matter

Since February is National Heart Month, we wanted to review the relationship between heart disease and gum disease.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death in North America and gum disease affects 46 percent of the population.  Gum disease, also known as Gingivitis or Periodontitis, is caused by bacteria that grows on the teeth under the gums. Studies show that patients with gum disease are at a higher risk for heart disease.

According to Science Daily, A University of Florida study shows that the same bacteria that cause gum disease also promotes heart disease — a discovery that could change the way heart disease is diagnosed and treated.

Understanding the importance of treating gum disease in patients with heart disease will lead to future studies and recommendations for careful attention to oral health in order to protect patients against heart disease

Brushing teeth twice a day and flossing at least once a day is recommended. Teeth should be professionally cleaned every six months.

At Brogdon Dental, we want to protect your smile as well as your heart.  Make your appointment today for your teeth cleaning. Your heart and your family will thank you.

Pass the Wine

You’ve read that red wine can help your heart but what about your teeth?  A new study suggests it could also have potential in preventing cavities.

According to huffingtonpost.com:

A recent study published in the  Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, showed that red wine was able to get rid of dental disease-causing bacteria in a lab setting.

Spanish researchers used a young Pinot Noir for the study, as well as a de-alcoholized version of the wine, which is a type of the wine that had grape seed extract added to it, and a solution of water with 12 percent ethanol (the positive control). Researchers also gathered saliva samples from five volunteers in order to grow biofilms with dental disease-causing bacteria.

The researchers dipped the biofilms into the different liquids to see their effects on the bacteria. They found that the red wine (both alcoholic and non-alcoholic), as well as wine spiked with grape seed extract, effectively got rid of the bacteria.

They noted that ethanol — which is in wine — is known to be antimicrobial, but that even the non-alcoholic wine had effects in reducing bacteria.

“Since treatments of the biofilm with both wine and dealcoholized wine inhibited F. nucleatum growth, it was likely that other wine components — apart from ethanol — had antimicrobial properties against this bacteria species,” the study said.

Looking for foods to help? Try eating food that help reduce cavity causing bacteria,  particularly ones that stimulate saliva production, which can neutralize acid. Good picks include, cheese, celery and pears.  You might even want to pair these foods with your glass of red wine for optimal prevention.

Worried about stains? Call us about teeth whitening.

 

Young Children and Tooth Decay

Tooth Decay in younger children has risen to epidemic proportions but it can be prevented.  According to USA Today,

Tooth decay is largely preventable, but it remains one of the most common diseases of childhood — five times as common as asthma, and seven times as common as hay fever, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC says 42% of children ages 2 to 11 have had cavities in baby teeth; 21% of those ages 6 to 11 have had cavities in permanent teeth.

It’s not difficult to get your child to practice good dental hygiene, it just takes time and repetition.  Children should begin early to develop good oral habits.  Here is a list of time guidelines to follow:

Birth to 2 years

• Before teeth erupt, clean baby’s mouth and gums with a soft cloth or infant toothbrush at bath time.

• Once teeth erupt, brush them gently with a soft child’s size toothbrush and a ‘smear’ of fluoridated toothpaste twice a day.

• At bedtime, give nothing but water. Any sugary liquids or carbohydrates (milk, formula, fruit juice) expose teeth to bacterial acid all night long

• Take a child to see a dental provider by his or her first birthday.

2 to 5 years

• Assist or brush your child’s teeth at least twice a day, once in the morning and once at night with a pea-size amount of fluoridated toothpaste. They don’t have the ability to brush effectively alone. They should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing.

• Schedule dental visits every six months for routine cleanings

• Begin flossing a child’s teeth when any two teeth are touching

• Limit the amount of juice you give a child to less than 6 oz. per day.

School-age children

• Parents should supervise their children’s brushing until they are 7 or 8 years old

• Don’t forget to floss their teeth once teeth are touching

• Chewing gum with XYLITOL, a non-sugar naturally occurring substance, to stimulate saliva flow helps clean the mouth (Make sure to ask the teacher first)

• Avoid carbonated beverages, which can erode enamel on teeth; sport drinks and juice pouches keep acid levels high and are also bad for teeth.

Source: American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

BeauBrogdon

It is good for your child to feel comfortable with their dentist and make the experience one that they can look forward to. Contact our office today to set up an appointment for your child to meet Dr Brogdon and our staff.  It’s never too early to begin practicing good dental habits.