A New Year – Goodbye to 2018

As we approach another new year, we look back on 2018 with thankfulness for all of our family and friends and all the things that happened during those 12 months. The good, the bad and the wonderful!

 

Through it all we would like to especially thank all our patients for using our services this year.  We wouldn’t be here without your support and we at Brogdon Dental just want to wish all of you a fantastic 2019 and remember… Keep Smiling!

We look forward to our continued relationship and seeing you all soon.

HNY2016

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G is for Gingivitis

Last month we learned that Flossing was more than just a dance. This month we are going to learn about Gingivitis. So what is Gingivitis? When plaque, which contains bacteria, builds up on teeth it creates an inflammation of the surrounding gum tissue. This gum disease is know as Gingivitis.

Left unchecked, gingivitis can develop into a more severe form of gum disease, known as Periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. In fact, 75% of Americans will experience gum disease at some point in their life.  It is also the number one cause of bleeding gums in adults.

gingivitis-symptoms

According to crest.com here are some steps to help prevent, if you don’t already have gingivitis, or to treat it if you do:

  • Use an anti-gingivitis toothpaste.
  • Use an anti-gingivitis mouthwash.
  • Brush your teeth and gums for at least 2 minutes, at least 2 times a day.
  • Floss at least once a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every 3 months: Worn-out bristles remove less plaque.
  • If you have sore gums after flossing or brushing, or notice bleeding, don’t stop brushing or flossing. Use a toothbrush with soft bristles so you don’t hurt your gums.  If you notice bleeding regularly, see your dentist.
  • Check your gums in the mirror often for changes in color or texture. If their appearance changes, see your dentist and hygienist.
  • Cut back on foods that are high in sugar. Sugar promotes the growth of gingivitis-causing plaque.

If you feel that you may have gingivitis or even periodontitis, please call call our office at Brogdon Dental as soon as possible so we can begin the process of reversing the problem and restoring healthy gums again.

 

 

F is for Floss

Floss! Is flossing important? Sure it is! Using floss (which is a thin piece of string, usually waxed) between your teeth can help remove food particles and plaque from in between teeth and around your gum line. There are places that your toothbrush just can’t reach and that’s where flossing comes in.

It is recommended that you floss once a day, at bedtime, to help remove what you haven’t been able to do with your toothbrush.  It is really more important than brushing alone.

There are various types of “floss” you can use if you don’t want to use the traditional string floss.  “Dental Flossers” look like a toothpick with a bristled end.  Interdental brushes which are thin, round or cone-shaped, these brushes have a small head with bristles held on by wire and a Water Flosser, which is an oral health appliance designed to removed plaque by the use of jet stream water, such as a WaterPic.

What ever you decide to use, the key is continual use every day. By finding the method best for you, you will be more apt to floss on a daily basis and that’s what’s important.

smallfloss

 

 

E is for Enamel

Have you ever wondered about your tooth enamel. What is it? Should you protect it? Is it important?

Enamel is the hardest material in your body.  It covers the outer layer of your tooth and is what you see when you look at your teeth.   Enamel is made up mostly of minerals, primarily hydroxyapatite.  Hydroxyapatite is defined as a natural calcium mineral and  an essential ingredient of normal bone and teeth. It can be various colors from light yellow to a grayish white.

Enamel is very important in protecting your teeth from decay, so it’s important to do all you can to keep your enamel from eroding.  It helps protect your teeth from sensitive things, such as hot and cold foods or beverages.

Your body cannot make more enamel to replace it if it is destroyed. Enamel does not contain any living cells, so unlike your bones, cannot regenerate. That’s why it’s important to do all you can to protect it.

Avoiding hard candies or those with lots of sugar and high acidic foods are a couple of ways to help.  Also, regular brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing, and visiting Dr. Brogdon for regular cleanings and check ups.

 

D is for Diabetes

So what does diabetes or being a diabetic have to do with your teeth? Plenty!  Almost 30 million in the United States alone suffer from diabetes.  It affects your your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body.

But what about your teeth? You have millions of tiny bacteria that live in your mouth and affect your teeth and gums.  This could result in Periodontal disease, which an inflammatory disease that, left unchecked, can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth and even your bones.

Periodontal disease is one of the more common dental diseases affecting diabetics. Nearly 22% of those diagnosed with diabetes suffer from this gum disease as well. As we age, poor blood sugar control can increase the risk for gum problems. And as with all infections, serious gum disease can cause blood sugar to rise.

So what can you do to prevent this?  Regular visits to your dentist are important.  Research has shown that treating gum disease can help in controlling blood sugar. Practicing good oral hygiene and having cleanings done at your dental office can even help in lowering your A1C numbers.

DiabetesBoxInfo

According to the American Dental Association, here are some things you can do for a healthier smile:

  • Control your blood sugar levels. Use your diabetes-related medications as directed, changing to a healthier diet and even exercising more can help. Good blood sugar control will also help your body fight any bacterial or fungal infections in your mouth and help relieve dry mouth caused by diabetes.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • If you wear any type of denture, clean it each day.
  • Make sure to brush twice a day with a soft brush and clean between your daily.
  • See your dentist for regular checkups. 

If you suffer from diabetes and haven’t seen us lately, give us a call at 423-870-5698 or email us at brogdondentalpc@gmail comWe are here to help.

C is for Crowns

A crown is a tooth shaped cap used to cover the tooth. It is used to restore the size, shape and strength of the tooth and to improve its appearance.  Once it is cemented in place, it will cover the entire tooth from the gum line.

In some cases a root canal will be required first, especially if the tooth is badly decayed or infected.  During the root canal, the nerve and the pulp are removed and the inside the tooth is cleaned and sealed which will prepare it for the crown.

At Brogdon Dental we offer crowns that can be made in one visit.  With innovative CEREC technology, we can create custom crowns, inlays, and onlays in about an hour. This means that in just one visit, you can get a custom-made, all-white, reliable restoration. No temporary. No follow-up visit. It’s that simple.