B is for Braces

Braces are used to treat malocclusion (where your teeth are crowded or crooked) or if you have a bad bite. In some case your teeth are not crooked but your upper and lower jaw doesn’t line up correctly.  Whatever the problem, braces may be a good alternative for you.

Many people get braces when they are young.  It’s a good idea for your child to get a dental evaluation by the age of 7 when the adult teeth begin to come in.  The best results are had when started at an early age, but the process usually begins between the ages of 8 and 14.

Even as an adult is is not too late to achieve a better smile.  It may take a little longer, but will be worth the time in the long run.

While you have braces it’s important to eat healthy. By avoiding too much sugary food, you can avoid plaque build-up around your braces that could permanently stain or damage your teeth. Also, foods such as popcorn, corn on the cob, chewing gum, whole apples, and other sticky foods like caramel and candies should not be eaten.

Its’ never too late to achieve the best smile possible.  Call us today to find out more about what braces can do for you or your child.

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A is for Anxiety

Do you dread going to the Dentist? Does your palms start to sweat and your heart starts beating faster when you walk in the door?  Do you find yourself avoiding making an appointment because of your fears?  If this describes you, you are not alone.  Somewhere between 9% and 20% of Americans avoid going to the dentist because of anxiety or fear.

According to WebMD here are some of the most common reasons for dental anxiety:

  • Fear of pain. Fear of pain is a very common reason for avoiding the dentist. This fear usually stems from an early dental experience that was unpleasant or painful or from dental “pain and horror” stories told by others. Thanks to the many advances in dentistry made over the years, most of today’s dental procedures are considerably less painful or even pain-free.
  • Fear of injections or fear the injection won’t work. Many people are terrified of needles, especially when inserted into their mouth. Beyond this fear, others fear that the anesthesia hasn’t yet taken effect or wasn’t a large enough dose to eliminate any pain before the dental procedure begins.
  • Fear of anesthetic side effects. Some people fear the potential side effects of anesthesia such as dizziness, feeling faint, or nausea. Others don’t like the numbness or “fat lip” associated with local anesthetics.
  • Feelings of helplessness and loss of control. It’s common for people to feel these emotions considering the situation — sitting in a dental chair with your mouth wide open, unable to see what’s going on.
  • Embarrassment and loss of personal space. Many people feel uncomfortable about the physical closeness of the dentist or hygienist to their face. Others may feel self-conscious about the appearance of their teeth or possible mouth odors.

If you suffer from any of these anxieties, the best thing you can do is talk about your fears with Dr Brogdon. He can discuss ways to make you feel less stressed and more comfortable.  Ask him to explain all he is doing, when he is doing it.  Knowing what to expect can help you relax. If you have any pain or just need to catch your breath, you might raise your hand or give him some signal to stop what he’s doing.

Dental Anxiety doesn’t have to keep you from having the best smile possible.  We are here to help.  Give us a call and set up that appointment.  Don’t be one of those 20%.

Our Dental Hygienist

A Dental Hygienist is an important part of any dental team.  They provide full oral health care, focusing on the prevention and treatment of oral disease and work closely with the Dentist.

Some of the duties they perform include:

  • Patient screening and intake procedures
  • Taking and developing x-rays of your teeth
  • Basic cleaning of your teeth
  • Applying sealants, fluorides, or other substances for preventing tooth decay
  • Assisting with procedures in cosmetic dentistry
  • Helping educate patients on proper oral care

One of the most important things to look at when choosing a Dental Practice is how long the Hygienist have been with the office. At Brogdon Dental our hygienist have been with us for many years.  We will spotlight some of them in future blogs.

Kids and their Teeth

When can you expect your baby’s teeth to first come in?  Generally, the first teeth begin to break through the gums at about 6 months of age.  These are the two bottom front teeth. Then you can expect to see the top four front teeth.  The rest of the teeth (20 at this time will fill in until your child is around 2 -3 years old.

According to WebMD here are some more facts about your baby and their teeth:

  • A general rule of thumb is that for every 6 months of life, approximately 4 teeth will erupt.
  • Girls generally precede boys in tooth eruption.
  • Lower teeth usually erupt before upper teeth.
  • Teeth in both jaws usually erupt in pairs — one on the right and one on the left.
  • Primary teeth are smaller in size and whiter in color than the permanent teeth that will follow.
  • By the time a child is 2 to 3 years of age, all primary teeth should have erupted.

By the ages of 6 and 12, a mixture of both primary teeth and permanent teeth will be in their mouth.

Even though they will only have their baby teeth for a short time, they serve an important purpose in your child’s dental development. Baby teeth…

  • Reserve space for their permanent counterparts
  • Give the face its normal appearance.
  • Aid in the development of clear speech.
  • Help attain good nutrition (missing or decayed teeth make it difficult to chew, causing children to reject foods)
  • Help give a healthy start to the permanent teeth (decay and infection in baby teeth can cause damage to the permanent teeth developing beneath them).

It’s important to set up a dental appointment soon after their teeth start coming in.  Call us today. 423-870-5698. Your kids will love it!

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March National Nutrition Month

When it comes to proper nutrition, every thing you eat counts. That’s why it’s important to look at all the things you eat to determine if it’s good or bad for your teeth.

Your mouth, teeth and gums, used in chewing and swallowing, are the first steps in the digestion process. This begins the process of delivering nutrients into the body. In addition, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.

Begin now learning to eat a well-balanced diet so that your body can get the nutrients needed for good health and wellness. If your body is low in the proper nutrients,  you may have a hard time fighting infections. A poor diet can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. Carbohydrates, sugars and starches help produce plaque acids that attack the tooth enamel, destroying teeth. Also, too much of these can lead to diabetes, heart disease, or even stroke.  Remember to read the labels on every food you purchase.

In order to maintain a balanced diet, try to eat a variety of foods from each of the five major food groups. Stay away from empty calorie foods and those high in sugar.  Choose a healthy stack such as cheese, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, almonds, or a piece of fruit.

Remember to watch what you eat and call us twice a year for your dental check up.

 

February Heart Month

Since February is known as Heart Month is there a relationship between your oral health and your heart health?

Heart Disease is defined as cardiovascular disease, and occurs when blood vessels either narrow or become completely blocked, a condition that can lead to a heart attack, stroke or chest pain.  So what does this have to do with your Oral Health?

Recent studies show that if you have gum disease in a moderate or advanced stage, you’re at greater risk for heart disease than someone with healthy gums.

According to colgate.com, patients with chronic gum conditions such as gingivitis or advanced periodontal disease have the highest risk for heart disease caused by poor oral health, particularly if it remains undiagnosed and unmanaged. The bacteria that are associated with gum infection are in the mouth and can enter the blood stream, where they attach to the blood vessels and increase your risk to cardiovascular disease. 

So what should you do? Regular dental exams and good oral hygiene are two ways to protect yourself against developing gum disease. Visit our office at Brogdon Dental for regular professional teeth cleanings.  We want to keep your heart and your smile healthy as well as beautiful!

New Year Resolutions

Here we are almost at the end of January. So how are you doing with your new years resolutions? Did you vow to set up that dental cleaning in January but never got around to it?

It’s never too late to start keeping those resolutions! We are here waiting to hear from you. Give us a call at 423-870-5698. Don’t wait for another month to pass you by…

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