Kids and their Teeth

When can you expect your baby’s teeth to first come in?  Generally, the first teeth begin to break through the gums at about 6 months of age.  These are the two bottom front teeth. Then you can expect to see the top four front teeth.  The rest of the teeth (20 at this time will fill in until your child is around 2 -3 years old.

According to WebMD here are some more facts about your baby and their teeth:

  • A general rule of thumb is that for every 6 months of life, approximately 4 teeth will erupt.
  • Girls generally precede boys in tooth eruption.
  • Lower teeth usually erupt before upper teeth.
  • Teeth in both jaws usually erupt in pairs — one on the right and one on the left.
  • Primary teeth are smaller in size and whiter in color than the permanent teeth that will follow.
  • By the time a child is 2 to 3 years of age, all primary teeth should have erupted.

By the ages of 6 and 12, a mixture of both primary teeth and permanent teeth will be in their mouth.

Even though they will only have their baby teeth for a short time, they serve an important purpose in your child’s dental development. Baby teeth…

  • Reserve space for their permanent counterparts
  • Give the face its normal appearance.
  • Aid in the development of clear speech.
  • Help attain good nutrition (missing or decayed teeth make it difficult to chew, causing children to reject foods)
  • Help give a healthy start to the permanent teeth (decay and infection in baby teeth can cause damage to the permanent teeth developing beneath them).

It’s important to set up a dental appointment soon after their teeth start coming in.  Call us today. 423-870-5698. Your kids will love it!

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March National Nutrition Month

When it comes to proper nutrition, every thing you eat counts. That’s why it’s important to look at all the things you eat to determine if it’s good or bad for your teeth.

Your mouth, teeth and gums, used in chewing and swallowing, are the first steps in the digestion process. This begins the process of delivering nutrients into the body. In addition, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.

Begin now learning to eat a well-balanced diet so that your body can get the nutrients needed for good health and wellness. If your body is low in the proper nutrients,  you may have a hard time fighting infections. A poor diet can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. Carbohydrates, sugars and starches help produce plaque acids that attack the tooth enamel, destroying teeth. Also, too much of these can lead to diabetes, heart disease, or even stroke.  Remember to read the labels on every food you purchase.

In order to maintain a balanced diet, try to eat a variety of foods from each of the five major food groups. Stay away from empty calorie foods and those high in sugar.  Choose a healthy stack such as cheese, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, almonds, or a piece of fruit.

Remember to watch what you eat and call us twice a year for your dental check up.

 

February Heart Month

Since February is known as Heart Month is there a relationship between your oral health and your heart health?

Heart Disease is defined as cardiovascular disease, and occurs when blood vessels either narrow or become completely blocked, a condition that can lead to a heart attack, stroke or chest pain.  So what does this have to do with your Oral Health?

Recent studies show that if you have gum disease in a moderate or advanced stage, you’re at greater risk for heart disease than someone with healthy gums.

According to colgate.com, patients with chronic gum conditions such as gingivitis or advanced periodontal disease have the highest risk for heart disease caused by poor oral health, particularly if it remains undiagnosed and unmanaged. The bacteria that are associated with gum infection are in the mouth and can enter the blood stream, where they attach to the blood vessels and increase your risk to cardiovascular disease. 

So what should you do? Regular dental exams and good oral hygiene are two ways to protect yourself against developing gum disease. Visit our office at Brogdon Dental for regular professional teeth cleanings.  We want to keep your heart and your smile healthy as well as beautiful!

New Year Resolutions

Here we are almost at the end of January. So how are you doing with your new years resolutions? Did you vow to set up that dental cleaning in January but never got around to it?

It’s never too late to start keeping those resolutions! We are here waiting to hear from you. Give us a call at 423-870-5698. Don’t wait for another month to pass you by…

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2017 in Review

As 2017 comes to an end, we at Brogdon Dental would like all our patients to know how much we have appreciated the opportunity to be of service to you and your families. If we have put a smile on your face where you didn’t have one before we are truly thankful.

We look forward to more smiles in 2018!

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Why we are Thankful

As we reflect on the meaning of this day, we are thankful for so many things. Our families and friends, this wonderful country with all the freedoms we experience, great food, a house to live in and our jobs. But most of all we are Thankful for you, our patients. Without you we wouldn’t be here.

So from all of us at Brogdon Dental, Happy Thanksgiving Day!

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The Purpose of Mouthwash

While it should not take the place of daily brushing and flossing, mouthwash is good to add to your daily oral hygiene routine.  The benefit of using a mouthwash is that it can reach areas not easily accessed by a toothbrush.

Basically there are two types of mouthwash: cosmetic and therapeutic.  Cosmetic mouthwash may temporarily control bad breath and leave behind a pleasant taste. If it doesn’t contain any ingredients that can kill bacteria, it would be considered cosmetic. Therapeutic mouthwashes on the other hand, contain ingredients that control or reduce conditions like bad breath, gingivitis, plaque, and tooth decay.

When choosing a mouthwash, be sure to look for the ADA Seal of  Approval.  Mouthwashes offer additional benefits such as reducing the risk of bad breath, cavities, or gum disease; or for relief of dry mouth or pain from oral sores

Remember, children younger than the age of 6 should not use mouthwash because of the risk of swallowing.

So use your mouthwash, either before or after brushing. Your teeth, mouth and gums will feel better for it.