H is for Halitosis

Halitosis, which is the scientific name for bad breath, happens to most all of us at one time or another. So what causes bad breath? Mostly it comes down to bad oral hygiene.

According to a recent article in Medical News Today, potential causes of bad breath can include the following:

  • Tobacco: Tobacco products cause their own types of mouth odor. Additionally, they increase the chances of gum disease which can also cause bad breath.
  • Food: The breakdown of food particles stuck in the teeth can cause odors. Some foods such as onions and garlic can also cause bad breath. After they are digested, their breakdown products are carried in the blood to the lungs where they can affect the breath.
  • Dry mouth: Saliva naturally cleans the mouth. If the mouth is naturally dry or dry due to a specific disease, such as xerostomia,  odors can build up.
  • Dental hygiene: Brushing and flossing ensure the removal of small particles of food that can build up and slowly break down, producing odor. A film of bacteria called plaque builds up if brushing is not regular. This plaque can irritate the gums and cause inflammation between the teeth and gums called periodontitis. Dentures that are not cleaned regularly or properly can also harbor bacteria that cause halitosis.
  • Crash diets: Fasting and low-carbohydrate eating programs can produce halitosis. This is due to the breakdown of fats producing chemicals called ketones. These ketones have a strong aroma.
  • Drugs: Certain medications can reduce saliva and, therefore, increase odors. Other drugs can produce odors as they breakdown and release chemicals in the breath. Examples include nitrates used to treat angina, some chemotherapy chemicals, and some tranquilizers. Individuals who take vitamin supplements in large doses can also be prone to bad breath.
  • Mouth, nose, and throat conditions: Sometimes, small, bacteria-covered stones can form on the tonsils at the back of the throat and produce odor. Also, infections or inflammation in the nose, throat, or sinuses can cause halitosis.
  • Foreign body: Bad breath can be caused if they have a foreign body lodged in their nasal cavity, especially in children.

What can you do to avoid bad breath?  Brush at least twice daily especially after a meal. Floss at least once a day to remove food particles and plaque left after brushing.  Replace your toothbrush every 2 to 3 months. Brush your tongue where bacteria and dead cells  can develop. Drink plenty of water to avoid dry mouth and avoid onion, garlic, spicy and sugary foods that are all linked with bad breath.

Above all, call our office at Brogdon Dental to set up an appoint for your annual cleaning and to discuss your concerns.  We look forward to hearing from you.

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G is for Gingivitis

Last month we learned that Flossing was more than just a dance. This month we are going to learn about Gingivitis. So what is Gingivitis? When plaque, which contains bacteria, builds up on teeth it creates an inflammation of the surrounding gum tissue. This gum disease is know as Gingivitis.

Left unchecked, gingivitis can develop into a more severe form of gum disease, known as Periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. In fact, 75% of Americans will experience gum disease at some point in their life.  It is also the number one cause of bleeding gums in adults.

gingivitis-symptoms

According to crest.com here are some steps to help prevent, if you don’t already have gingivitis, or to treat it if you do:

  • Use an anti-gingivitis toothpaste.
  • Use an anti-gingivitis mouthwash.
  • Brush your teeth and gums for at least 2 minutes, at least 2 times a day.
  • Floss at least once a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every 3 months: Worn-out bristles remove less plaque.
  • If you have sore gums after flossing or brushing, or notice bleeding, don’t stop brushing or flossing. Use a toothbrush with soft bristles so you don’t hurt your gums.  If you notice bleeding regularly, see your dentist.
  • Check your gums in the mirror often for changes in color or texture. If their appearance changes, see your dentist and hygienist.
  • Cut back on foods that are high in sugar. Sugar promotes the growth of gingivitis-causing plaque.

If you feel that you may have gingivitis or even periodontitis, please call call our office at Brogdon Dental as soon as possible so we can begin the process of reversing the problem and restoring healthy gums again.

 

 

Time…

“In the nick of Time… All in good Time…Only a matter of Time…Time will tell…Time Flies…” We’ve all heard these catch phases concerning time.  In the busy world we live in, it just seems that we have so little of it and our days fly by in a rush.  We look around us and wondered where the time went.

We at Brogdon Dental realize how important your time is to you. Because of that, we have added forms on our website for all our new patients to download, print and fill out before their scheduled appointment.

Visit our website at www.brogdondentalpc.com and scroll down until you see our list of patient forms. We have created these in a PDF format for your convenience.

We look forward to your visit and hope you will have the “time of your life”!

 

May is National Smile Month

May 16th begins National Smile Month, a national campaign to promote good oral health in children and adults. Here are some key points from nationalsmilemonth.org to maintain a health smile:

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and on at least one other occasion with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks.
  • Visit your dentist regularly.
  • Change your toothbrush every two to three months or sooner if it becomes worn.
  • Clean in between your teeth at least once a day using floss.
  • If you are nervous about visiting the dentist, make sure they are aware of why so they can improve your treatment.

A great smile can improve your self-confidence, create a positive mind set and can change not only your mouth, but your body too.

BeauBrogdon

We at Brogdon Dental want you to get your smile on. Call us today to make an appointment.

 

 

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss and a Fork 4

When you think of foods that are good for your teeth and gums you probably don’t think about mushrooms. Mushrooms?  Surprisingly, mushrooms can help with plaque formation.

mushrooms

Mushrooms

When plaque lingers on teeth, it hardens and forms tartar, which leads to gum disease. Only a dental hygienist can remove tartar, but shiitake mushrooms can stop plaque from forming in the first place.

A 2000 Japanese study at Nihon University found that a sugar in shiitake mushrooms (lentinan) creates an unfriendly environment for various plaque-causing Streptococcus bacteria.

Beating plaque is as easy as adding a cup of shiitake mushrooms to a stir-fry or stew. 

Yes they are good for your teeth! Who would have known.

Brushing Techniques

What kind of technique do you use when you brush your teeth? According to the American Dental Association,

… for the most thorough cleaning, start with your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to your gums and brush gently back and forth in tooth-wide strokes. To scrub the inside of your front teeth, hold your toothbrush vertically and make up-and-down strokes. Make sure to get all surfaces of each tooth, and brush your tongue, too!

By using this technique and visiting your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and exams, you can maintain good oral health. Contact us at Brogdon Dental 870-5698 to schedule your next dental appointment.

 

Healthy Gums – Healthy Heart

Did you know that brushing and flossing your teeth can help you avoid heart disease? Having clean teeth and healthy gums could reduce your chances of atherosclerosis.

So how does bacteria in your mouth affect your heart? The bacteria could possible enter the bloodstream through your gums, traveling to the rest of the body.  This bacteria could create inflammation, resulting in the clogging of arteries.

According to WebMD,

Gingivitis is an infection of the gums usually caused by poor oral hygiene. Gums become inflamed, swollen, and bleed. Bacteria within plaque (which forms on teeth) lead to chronic inflammation of the gum line and tooth loss. Chronic inflammation caused by periodontal disease has been linked to a greater risk of cardiovascular disease.

Every day, an estimated 2,600 people in the U.S. die of heart disease, says the American Heart Association. That’s an average of one death every 34 seconds. Every 45 seconds, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke – or about 700,000 people this year.

Heart attack and stroke can strike anyone. Each year, heart disease kills 150,000 people younger than 65, says the AHA.

There are lots of ways to prevent heart disease. Diet, exercise, handling stress better, and keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure under control are all good. Brushing and flossing are not a substitute for these measures, but they are two of the simplest things you can do to help your heart.  If you haven’t had your teeth cleaned in the last 6 months you need to call us at Brogdon Dental to set up an appointment.