Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss – and a Fork 12

This is the last in our series on food and your teeth.  Our subject today is Wasabi. That may seem like a odd food, but Wasabi, or Japanese horseradish, is a hot ingredient used in relation with Oriental cooking. This spicy condiment is known to safeguard healthy teeth by fighting bacteria that cause cavities and gum abscesses.

Wasabi root also helps reduce Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a bacteria that leads to stomach ulcers, unpleasant burping and bad breath, according to a 2004 study at Juntendo University School of Medicine in Tokyo. 

So the next time you order sushi, don’t forget the Wasabi.  It’s good for your stomach as well as your teeth.

wasabi

Oral Health and Body Health

There is a relationship between our teeth, gum and body. Our body is considered an ecosystem and our mouth is the main entrance to it. What goes through our mouths and into our body determines many of the diseases we contract.

Each tooth is surrounded by gums that create a seal that controls the bacteria that enters our body. If we fail to take care of this seal, and allow it to be weakened, we open the door for all kinds of things to enter our bloodstream causing a myriad of problems.

teethgums

According to OraGuard, Ltd, listed below are of some diseases that we can develop as a result of bacteria entering the body through the mouth and gums:

 

  • IBS
    Oral bacteria can enter the bloodstream and attack the friendly bacteria in your gut. And that’s when your digestive issues begin to worsen.
  • Breast cancer
    Women may be 11 times more likely to develop breast cancer due to lack of good oral care.
  • Prostate cancer
    Research has shown that men with indicators of periodontal disease and prostatitis have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of these conditions.
  • Diabetes
    Serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes.
  • Weight gain
    Oral health, diabetes, and obesity are intertwined and inflammation is at the core of  this complex interaction
  • Alzheimer’s and dementia
    Research shows gum disease bacteria lipopolysaccharides (the surface of the bacterium) in samples from people suffering from dementia and none of the people who do not have the condition.
  • Cardiovascular disease including stroke, heart attack, infective endocarditis, and thickening of the arteries
    When bacteria reach the heart, they can attach themselves to any damaged area and cause inflammation.
  • Low birthweight and premature birth
    Periodontal health also plays a key role in a healthy pregnancy. Research suggests that pregnant women with gum disease are at higher risk for pre-term and low birth weight deliveries.
  • Bacterial pneumonia
    Bacterial infections in the chest are believed to be caused by breathing droplets from the mouth and throat into the lungs.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
    Those who had moderate to severe periodontitis had more than twice the risk of RA compared to those with mild or no periodontitis

We don’t realize how important our oral health is in relation to a healthy body, but we need to think about not only what we put in our mouths, but how we take care of our mouths, which includes our teeth and gums. Good oral health is not only brushing your teeth and visiting your dentist, but don’t forgot to do this as well.

Contact our office at Brogdon Dental to set up your cleaning today.

 

 

Preventing Oral Cancer

There are many ways to help prevent developing oral cancer.  Some of the things you can do is practicing good oral hygiene to prevent tooth decay and gum disease, brushing regularly with fluoride toothpaste, flossing and limiting the amount of sweets you eat. Also you might consider regulating your consumption of alcohol, smoking and chewing tobacco and limiting your exposure to the sun. Visit your dentist every six months for a cleaning and check up will help in prevention.

You might want to consider increasing your intake of folic acid. According to the American Dental Association, women especially that consume folate, which is a water-soluble B vitamin, may protect themselves from developing oral cancer. Some of the food that are rich in folate and B vitamins are leafy green vegetable, beans and peas, and citrus fruits and juices. There are many foods that contain folic acid which is a synthetic form of folate. These include grains, breads, flours, corn meals, cereals, rice, and pasta to name a few.

So besides using good dental hygiene, consider improving your diet. Call us at Brogdon Dental to schedule your next cleaning and oral check up.

One Reason for Dental Cleaning

There are many reasons to see your dentist for dental cleanings and its not just to keep your smile looking bright. One of those reasons could be your breath.

Some of the causes of bad breath include:

  • Food We Eat 
  • Infrequent Brushing and Flossing
  • Oral Diseases and Infections
  • Dry Mouth
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Medical Conditions

Some of the things you can do to prevent bad breath is to brush and floss at least two times a day, especially after a meal that contains foods that are known to cause bad breath. Also consider the use of a tongue scraper. Rinse thoroughly with water or mouthwash afterwards.

If your bad breath is caused by smoking, take steps to stop. This can also help combat periodontal disease. If you experience dry mouth, try sipping water throughout the day and during meals. Chew sugar-free gum or dissolve sugar-free candy in your mouth to help produce more saliva.

Gum, mints, mouthwashes and breath sprays are just temporary measures to mask your bad breath. Make sure that you call our office at Brogdon Dental to schedule an appointment for a complete examination of your teeth and gums and a thorough cleaning by our hygienist. We recommend you visit our office every six months for routine cleaning.

Take your vitamins…

How many times did you hear your mother say, “Did you take your vitamins?”  I know as a kid my Mom would say this to me every morning before school as she would dole out our Flintstone vitamins. But seriously, vitamins do play a major role in our health, but did you know that certain vitamins can help with your dental health?  Doctors have found that Calcium and Vitamin D not only help your bones but can help strengthen your teeth as well.

According to WebMD… “If you’re supplementing your diet with calcium and vitamin D to prevent bone loss, you may be more likely to hang onto your pearly whites, according to a report from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Toronto.”

To explore the role of supplementation on tooth retention, the researchers followed more than 140 older adults for five years. Participants took either a placebo or 500 mg of calcium plus 700 units of vitamin D daily for three years. Both during and after the trial, their teeth were examined periodically.

For those who took supplements, the likelihood of losing one or more teeth was 40% less, even two years later. Tooth loss was also linked to the number of cavities, frequency of flossing, and use of thiazide diuretics, a type of medication that helps lower blood pressure.

Adding vitamins like calcium and vitamin D to your morning regime can not only help you feel better and have stronger bones, but can help save your teeth.

Be sure not to overdo though. The recommended upper limits are 2,500 mg a day for calcium and 1,000 units a day for vitamin D. Any more than that could be toxic. Be sure to check with your doctor if you take more than the recommended amount.

And don’t forget to brush and floss daily as well. Your Mom would be proud!

 

Dehydration and Oral Health

Although summer may be coming to a close, temperatures continue to soar in to the upper 90’s. The end of summer has many students heading back to school.  With the beginning of the new school year brings the start of high school athletics. Many kids will participate in practices, especially football, in the late afternoon heat after classes. The need to maintain adequate hydration is essential, especially considering the many problems it can cause. Failure to drink enough fluids before physical activity can result in serious issues.

One of the first warning signs of dehydration is dry mouth.  You may find that you have trouble swallowing, and others may notice that you have bad breath, which is one of the problems associated with a dry mouth.  If your mouth is not producing enough saliva it can become an breeding ground for bacteria. This bacteria causes infections that may lead to cavities and gingivitis.

We need sufficient saliva in our mouths to wash away food debris and reduce plaque, which is why severe tooth decay and gum disease can occur if dry mouth is left untreated. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, 30 percent of all tooth decay in older adults is caused by dry mouth. (www.toothwisdom.org)

Besides drinking plenty of water and brushing and flossing daily; chewing sugar free gum or sucking on sugar free mints can help fight dry mouth since they stimulates saliva production. Products that contain xylitol (a sugar substitute) can actually help prevent cavities.

As the temperatures still continue to rise, keep a check on your hydration. If you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated. Experts recommend at least a gallon (eight 8-ounce glasses) of water per day. Dehydration effects every part of your body including your oral health. Keep drinking water.

June Oral Health Month

Since summer is here and children are out of school, what better time to begin educating you kids while they are home about proper dental care.

Children learn by example and Mother’s especially can help their kids develop good habits now for the future. Those habits include brushing twice daily with a good fluoride toothpaste, using the proper toothbrush, and flossing daily.

These habits they create will not only help them, but the parents as well. This is also a good time to set up your appointment with us. Call Brogdon Dental today, while you have extra time this summer. It will pass before you know it!