Toothpaste in History

Last time we discussed the history of the toothbrush, but have you ever wondered about the toothpaste you use?  Apparently toothpaste has been around for a long time in some shape or fashion, longer in fact than the toothbrush. The first formula for toothpaste was created by, you guess it, the Egyptians, in 5000 BC.  A concoction made up of crushed rock salt, mint, dried iris flowers and pepper, were mixed together which created a powder, when mixed with water, was used in cleaning teeth. Also a power of crusted oyster shells and bones was often used. But let’s not forget the ancient Greeks and Romans, who used a powder made up of ashes of ox hooves and burned eggshells and added more flavoring to help with bad breath, as well as powdered charcoal and bark.

According to spearseducation.com, here are some important dates in the history of toothpaste:

1780: People were known to scrub their teeth with a powder that was made up of mainly burnt bread. That’s right – what a lot of us eat for breakfast was once considered an effective solution for clean and healthy teeth.

1824: A dentist named Peabody added soap to toothpaste for added cleanliness. Soap was later replaced by sodium lauryn sulfate to create a smooth paste.

1873: The first commercially produced, nice-smelling toothpaste was launched by Colgate and sold in a jar.

1892: Dr. Washington Sheffield is the first person to put toothpaste in a collapsible tube. It has been suggested that this version of toothpaste is the most similar to today’s version.

1914:  Fluoride is added to toothpastes after discovering it significantly decreased dental cavities.

1975: Herbal toothpastes, such as Tom’s, becomes available as an alternative to cleaning teeth without fluoride. These toothpastes include ingredients like peppermint oil, myrrh and plant extracts.

1987: Edible toothpaste is invented. What is mainly used by children just learning to brush their teeth was actually invented by NASA so astronauts could brush their teeth without spitting into a zero-gravity abyss.

1989: Rembrandt invented the first toothpaste that claimed to whiten and brighten your smile.

The toothpastes we find today typically contain fluoride, coloring, flavoring, sweetener, as well as ingredients that make the toothpaste a smooth paste, foam and stay moist. Toothpaste in a tube, is used throughout the world.

Maybe it’s taken 5000 years, but dental care has improved as well as the taste of your toothpaste.

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Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss – and a Fork 8

Last time we talked about foods and teeth we discussed cheese. With this post we will talk about Almonds. Did you realize that almonds (as well as other nuts) contain vitamins, minerals, calcium, iron, potassium, zinc and other nutrients that are good for your teeth?

Not only are almonds good for your teeth, but they are high in monounsaturated fats which have been associated with reduced risk of heart disease.

almonds

To stay strong, healthy teeth need a combination of phosphorus for bone formation; vitamin D and magnesium for calcium absorption; vitamin B to prevent mouth sores; and vitamin C and potassium for strong gum tissue.

One food packed with all these healthy-teeth nutrients is an ounce of almonds (about 20-25 nuts).

Almonds also neutralize cavity-causing acids, says David Leader, D.D.S, assistant clinical professor at Tufts Dental School in Boston.

Who doesn’t like nuts? What an enjoyable way to introduce healthy vitamins and minerals in your diet! So have a hand full of nuts and call our office to set up your next dental appointment.

May is National Smile Month

May 16th begins National Smile Month, a national campaign to promote good oral health in children and adults. Here are some key points from nationalsmilemonth.org to maintain a health smile:

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and on at least one other occasion with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks.
  • Visit your dentist regularly.
  • Change your toothbrush every two to three months or sooner if it becomes worn.
  • Clean in between your teeth at least once a day using floss.
  • If you are nervous about visiting the dentist, make sure they are aware of why so they can improve your treatment.

A great smile can improve your self-confidence, create a positive mind set and can change not only your mouth, but your body too.

BeauBrogdon

We at Brogdon Dental want you to get your smile on. Call us today to make an appointment.

 

 

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss and a Fork 5

February is the month for love and what better way to express your love than with Chocolate.  But isn’t chocolate bad for your teeth? Surprisingly no! In fact chocolate can be good for your teeth as the following studies show.

dark chocolate

5. Chocolate

Candy is a dentist’s nemesis, but unique properties in cocoa and its husk actually maintain healthy teeth, according to several new studies.

Cocoa extracts work as well as fluoride to strengthen teeth and protect them from decay, Japanese researchers at Osaka University discovered. But not just any chocolate will do. 

Tulane University researchers compared different types of European chocolate and found that dark chocolate, made from 70% cocoa, had the most protective effect, because it contains the most polyphenols (health-boosting compounds) to protect teeth. 

And it doesn’t take much. Study participants ate a small 15 gram (g) piece of dark chocolate (approximately 76 calories). 

The 2007 study’s lead researcher Arman Sadeghpour, Ph.D., has patented, and is producing a new peppermint-cocoa toothpaste called Theodent, which he says is an effective natural alternative to fluoride toothpaste.

The Tulane study could prove beneficial especially since the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services concluded in 2011 that Americans might be getting too much fluoride from drinking water and food sources. Too much fluoride can lead to fluorosis, resulting in a permanent staining of teeth and brittle bones. (lifescripts.com)

Wow, chocolate toothpaste. That could be a new Valentine’s gift!

Need your teeth whitened as well?  Give us a call to set up your appointment. Brogdon Dental 423-870-5698.

 

Trick or Treat for your Kids Teeth

Can Halloween treats be tricks for your kids teeth? What are the best treats for your kids to indulge in this year? the worse?  Here is a list of some of the good and bad treats for your kids.

Good Treats:

  • frozen fruit bars with chunks of real fruit
  • sugar-free gum
  • light popcorn
  • pretzels

Not too Scary:

  • chocolate without sticky fillings
  • peanut butter cups
  • sugar-free lollipops

Bad Tricks:

  • taffy
  • gummy bears
  • caramel
  • sour candies
  • jawbreakers

While all candies are not bad for your teeth, eating too much of anything, even good things, is not recommended. Remember, anything that can get stuck in your teeth is probably not good for your teeth. And don’t forget to brush and floss. At Brogdon Dental, we want to help your kids keep their boo-tiful smiles!

Is Your Toothbrush Making you Sick?

You may have heard that your toothbrush can contain germs that can make you sick.  The fact is that there is more bacteria in your mouth than anywhere else in your body, so some of these germs can get on your toothbrush when you brush your teeth.  Also, since most people store their toothbrush in the bathroom, which is a warm, moist environment, the likelihood of more airborne bacteria increases.

Toothbrush

So are there some simple methods you can do to protect your toothbrush from bacteria and yourself from being sick?

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), a simple regimen for toothbrush care is sufficient to remove most microorganisms from your toothbrush and limit the spread of disease. Here are some common-sense steps you can take:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after brushing or flossing.
  • After brushing, rinse your toothbrush with warm water and store it upright to air-dry.
  • Don’t cover your toothbrush or place it in a closed container until it is completely dry. A moist environment can foster bacterial growth.
  • Use a completely dry toothbrush. Everyone should have two toothbrushes to give ample time (24 hours) for it to dry out in between uses.
  • Don’t share a toothbrush with anyone. Also, don’t store toothbrushes in a way that might cause them to touch and spread germs.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three or four months. Dentists recommend this practice not as prevention against contamination, but because toothbrushes wear out and become less effective at cleaning teeth.
  • Always replace your toothbrush after a cold or other illness to prevent contamination.
  • If you or someone else in your family is sick, that person should use a different tube of toothpaste (travel size, for example), to prevent spreading germs to other toothbrushes.

(Courtesy of the American Dental Association)

 

October National Dental Hygiene Month

October is National Dental Hygiene Month.  Two things important to good dental hygiene is brushing and flossing. Today we will focus on brushing.

According to American Dental Hygienists’ Association

Research shows that brushing for two minutes is the single most important method for reducing plaque and preventing cavities, gingivitis and other plaque-related diseases. Brushing for two minutes twice a day is crucial to maintaining healthy smiles. Proper brushing technique cleans teeth and gums effectively.

Knowyourteeth.com has some easy techniques for you to follow while brushing…

Place a toothbrush (soft, rounded, multi-tufted brush) beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue, the chewing surfaces and between teeth. Using a back-and-forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, can expose the root surface or make the root surface tender. You also risk wearing down the gum line.

REMEMBER:

Always brush two minutes, two times a day, every day! 2x 2x 1 = Good Dental Hygiene