New Year Resolutions

Here we are almost at the end of January. So how are you doing with your new years resolutions? Did you vow to set up that dental cleaning in January but never got around to it?

It’s never too late to start keeping those resolutions! We are here waiting to hear from you. Give us a call at 423-870-5698. Don’t wait for another month to pass you by…

HNY2016

 

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Our Wonderful Patients

We love our wonderful patients, and apparently the feeling is mutual!  Here are a few of the kind words we have received…

Brogdon Dental you are the best! Thanks so much for the awesome gift and the wonderful report on my cleaning today – A beautiful smile is a happy smile!  -Tammie D.

I’ve been a patient here for nearly twenty years, and the wonderful staff has always been so friendly and thorough. Angela is my hygienist. She is kind-hearted and attentive, and she has always taken excellent care of my teeth. The office staff has always provided outstanding service, the best I have encountered at any doctor’s office. I’m a teacher and they even file my claims with HCDE for reimbursement. (That is a service that is not provided at my son’s dentist office, and while it may seem minor, it is very helpful for this busy teacher!) I expect to grow old with the folks at Brogdon Dental; I am very happy with their care. – Sally W.

I have been patient of Brogdon Dental for many years and have always received excellent care. The staff is very caring and go out of their way to be friendly. The practice has keep up on all the recent updates for dental care. I would recommend to anyone looking for dentist. – Robert D.

As always, a visit to Brogdon Dental is an experience not to be duplicated on a visit to any other dental office. The staff is ultra friendly and more than willing to make your visit a pleasant one. In all this time, I have had numerous dental procedures done, and I have never had one moment of pain or discomfort. My family and I have been patients of Dr. Joseph Brogdon, Sr., and now of Dr. Joe Brodgon, Jr, and Dr. Josh McKinney now, more than 35 years, and cannot say enough about their treatment and service. If you want a good dentist, with no pain and no hassle, I recommend them 100%. – Sally S.

I’ve been going to Brogdon dental for years now and would never go anywhere else. They are so gentle and kind! I take my daughter there and she has no fear of the dentist thanks to them. The office staff knows your name and I look forward to my dental visits!  – Torri H.

Come in and see us in 2018 and join these patients who highly recommend our services and our staff.  We look forward to seeing you!

staff 2017

 

More Fun Dental Facts

Here are some more fun facts about teeth from 123dentist.com…

  • The enamel on the top surface on your tooth is the hardest part of your entire body.
  • No two people have the same set of teeth.
  • Your mouth produces over 25,000 quarts of saliva in a lifetime—that’s enough to fill two swimming pools. Saliva has many uses, including assisting you with your digestion and protects your teeth from bacteria in your mouth.
  • Many diseases are linked to your oral health, including heart disease, osteoporosis, and diabetes.
  • One third of your tooth is underneath your gums—that means only two thirds of your tooth’s length is visible.
  • Teeth start to form even before you are born—milk teeth or baby teeth start to form when the baby is in the womb, but they come through when the child is between 6-12 months old. 
  • If you get your tooth knocked out, put it in milk and hold it in your mouth—this will help your tooth to survive longer. Make sure you see a dentist right away.
  • Toothpicks are the object most often choked on by Americans.

 

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Interesting Facts about Teeth

Here are some interesting facts about teeth, courtesy of the Children’s Dental Village.

  • The average American spends 38.5 total days brushing their teeth over a lifetime.
  • People who drink 3 or more glasses of soda each day have 62% more tooth decay, fillings and tooth loss than others. Put down the pop and sports drinks and pick up some nice fresh water instead.
  • Just like finger prints, tooth prints are unique to each individual.
  • More people use blue toothbrushes than red ones.
  • If you’re right handed, you will chew your food on your right side. If you’re left handed, you will tend to chew your food on your left side.
  • If you don’t floss, you miss cleaning 40% of your tooth surfaces. Make sure you brush and floss twice a day!
  • More than 300 types of bacteria make up dental plaque.
  • 78% of Americans have had at least 1 cavity by age 17.
  • Dogs have 42 teeth, cats have 30 teeth, pigs have 44 teeth, and an armadillo has 104 teeth.
  • Kids laugh around 400 times a day, adults just 15 times a day.
  • The average woman smiles 62 times a day. The average man smiles about 8 times a day.

So brush and floss your teeth, drink plenty of water and SMILE…

smile

 

What about Dental Floss?

Did you ever think about where dental floss came from or when it was invented?

According to Wikipedia…

Levi Spear Parmly, a dentist from New Orleans, is credited with inventing the first form of dental floss. In 1819, he recommended running a waxen silk thread “through the interstices of the teeth, between their necks and the arches of the gum, to dislodge that irritating matter which no brush can remove and which is the real source of disease.” He considered this the most important part of oral care. Floss was not commercially available until 1882, when the Codman and Shurtleft company started producing unwaxed silk floss. in 1898, the Johnson & Johnson Corporation received the first patent for dental floss that was made from the same silk material used by doctors for silk stitches.

Nylon floss was developed during World War II by Dr Charles C Bass. He found it to be better than silk because of its texture which was more resistant and that it could be produced in various lengths and sizes.

Today, variety of dental flosses are available. Waxed, unwaxed monofilaments and multifilaments are most popular. Thicknesses and widths vary. Some waxed types of dental floss are said to contain antibacterial agents.

toothcleaning

No matter what type or size of floss you choose, it’s important to floss once a day before or after brushing to allow the fluoride from the toothpaste to reach between the teeth.

 

 

History of the Toothbrush

Have you ever wondered where the toothbrush came from that you have in your bathroom medicine cabinet?  According to the Library of Congress, the toothbrush that we use today was not invented until 1938. However, there are many other early forms of toothbrushes that have been around since 3000 BC. Ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans used what was referred to as a “chew stick” which was a thin stick with a frayed end.  The teeth were “cleaned” by chewing on the frayed end.

Bristle toothbrushes were invented in China in 1498. These brushes were made with hairs taken from the backs of hog’s necks and attached to bone or bamboo handles.

In 1938, Dupont de Nemours introduced the first nylon toothbrush called Doctor West’s Miracle Toothbrush.  Compared to using a boar bristle toothbrush, this was probably looked on as a miracle! Now we have various toothbrush shapes, sizes, textures and handle styles to choose from.

Toothbrush

Here are some other interesting facts about toothbrushes:

  • The first mass-produced toothbrush was made by William Addis of Clerkenwald, England, around 1780.
  • The first American to patent a toothbrush was H.N. Wadsworth, on November 7, 1857.
  • Mass production of toothbrushes began in America around 1885.
  • One of the first electric toothbrushes to hit the American market was in 1960. It was marketed by the Squibb company under the name of Broxodent.
  • On average, each person in the U.S. purchases three toothbrushes every 2 years although the ADA recommends that toothbrushes be changed every 3 to 4 months.
(courtesy of The Library of Congress)

April Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Since over 45,000 people will be diagnosed with oral or throat cancer this year, we urge you to see us if you haven’t had a dental exam in a while.  When cancer is detected and treated early, treatment-related health problems can be reduced.

Regular oral cancer examinations can help detect oral cancer in its early stages. Dental visits can improve the chances that any suspicious changes in your oral health will be caught early, at a time when cancer can be treated more easily.

According to the American Dental Association here is a list of signs and symptoms you should be aware of in relation to your oral health, especially if they last more than two weeks:

  • a sore or irritation that doesn’t go away
  • red or white patches
  • pain, tenderness or numbness in mouth or lips
  • a lump, thickening, rough spot, crust or small eroded area
  • difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking, or moving your jaw or tongue
  • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you close your mouth

If you notice any of these changes, please call our office immediately to set up an appointment.  Don’t ignore any suspicious lumps or sores that last more than two weeks. Prompt examination could make a difference.