Why Dental Cleanings are Essential

Do you ever wonder why your dentist recommends you come back to see them every six months? Not only to we enjoy seeing you, but regular dental visits are essential for the maintenance of healthy teeth and gums.  It’s also up to you to keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy between those visits. Plaque and tartar can build up in a very short time if good oral hygiene is not practiced. If not treated, plaque can lead to gum disease.

teethbrushing

After your dental exam we will perform a dental cleaning which consist of:

  • Checking the cleanliness of your teeth and gums
  • Removing any plaque and tartar
  • Polishing your teeth
  • Flossing between your teeth
  • Reviewing recommended brushing and flossing techniques

Once we are finished with your cleaning, we’ll tell you more about the health of your teeth and gums and make any recommendations we feel is warranted.  Remember, by seeing our staff at Brogdon Dental on a routine basis (at least every 6 months) and following our recommendations of good, daily oral hygiene practices, you can be sure that you will keep your teeth and gums healthy. And isn’t that what it’s all about?

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

What about Dental Floss?

Did you ever think about where dental floss came from or when it was invented?

According to Wikipedia…

Levi Spear Parmly, a dentist from New Orleans, is credited with inventing the first form of dental floss. In 1819, he recommended running a waxen silk thread “through the interstices of the teeth, between their necks and the arches of the gum, to dislodge that irritating matter which no brush can remove and which is the real source of disease.” He considered this the most important part of oral care. Floss was not commercially available until 1882, when the Codman and Shurtleft company started producing unwaxed silk floss. in 1898, the Johnson & Johnson Corporation received the first patent for dental floss that was made from the same silk material used by doctors for silk stitches.

Nylon floss was developed during World War II by Dr Charles C Bass. He found it to be better than silk because of its texture which was more resistant and that it could be produced in various lengths and sizes.

Today, variety of dental flosses are available. Waxed, unwaxed monofilaments and multifilaments are most popular. Thicknesses and widths vary. Some waxed types of dental floss are said to contain antibacterial agents.

toothcleaning

No matter what type or size of floss you choose, it’s important to floss once a day before or after brushing to allow the fluoride from the toothpaste to reach between the teeth.

 

 

May is National Smile Month

May 16th begins National Smile Month, a national campaign to promote good oral health in children and adults. Here are some key points from nationalsmilemonth.org to maintain a health smile:

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and on at least one other occasion with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks.
  • Visit your dentist regularly.
  • Change your toothbrush every two to three months or sooner if it becomes worn.
  • Clean in between your teeth at least once a day using floss.
  • If you are nervous about visiting the dentist, make sure they are aware of why so they can improve your treatment.

A great smile can improve your self-confidence, create a positive mind set and can change not only your mouth, but your body too.

BeauBrogdon

We at Brogdon Dental want you to get your smile on. Call us today to make an appointment.

 

 

Healthy Gums – Healthy Heart

Did you know that brushing and flossing your teeth can help you avoid heart disease? Having clean teeth and healthy gums could reduce your chances of atherosclerosis.

So how does bacteria in your mouth affect your heart? The bacteria could possible enter the bloodstream through your gums, traveling to the rest of the body.  This bacteria could create inflammation, resulting in the clogging of arteries.

According to WebMD,

Gingivitis is an infection of the gums usually caused by poor oral hygiene. Gums become inflamed, swollen, and bleed. Bacteria within plaque (which forms on teeth) lead to chronic inflammation of the gum line and tooth loss. Chronic inflammation caused by periodontal disease has been linked to a greater risk of cardiovascular disease.

Every day, an estimated 2,600 people in the U.S. die of heart disease, says the American Heart Association. That’s an average of one death every 34 seconds. Every 45 seconds, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke – or about 700,000 people this year.

Heart attack and stroke can strike anyone. Each year, heart disease kills 150,000 people younger than 65, says the AHA.

There are lots of ways to prevent heart disease. Diet, exercise, handling stress better, and keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure under control are all good. Brushing and flossing are not a substitute for these measures, but they are two of the simplest things you can do to help your heart.  If you haven’t had your teeth cleaned in the last 6 months you need to call us at Brogdon Dental to set up an appointment.

October National Dental Hygiene Month Part 2

October is National Dental Hygiene Month.  Two things important to good dental hygiene is brushing and flossing. Today’s blog will focus on flossing.

We all know how important brushing your teeth twice a day is, but do you give as much thought to flossing? Brushing cleans the teeth on three sides, but it is equally important to get between the teeth where it is difficult to reach.

According to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, daily flossing should be part of our daily dental hygiene routine.

Daily flossing removes plaque and food particles that cannot be reached by a toothbrush, particularly under the gum line and between teeth. Failure to do so can allow for plaque buildup in these areas – which in turn can lead to tooth decay and gum disease.

Getting into the routine of daily flossing can be a challenge. Making flossing easier can improve compliance with recommendations for daily flossing. If you resist flossing, try to determine why and tell your dental hygienist. Knowing the precise reason you are not flossing will enable them to recommend floss with the right thickness, coating or filaments so you might be encouraged to floss more often.

If you are unsure how to floss here are some tips from toothwisdom.org:

Floss once per day before or after brushing.

  • Use about 18 inches of dental floss wrapped around one of your middle fingers, with the other end wrapped around the opposite middle finger.
  • Hold the dental floss tightly between the thumbs and pointer finger and gently insert it between the teeth.
  • Curve the dental floss against the side of the tooth in a ‘C’ shape.
  • Wipe the floss up and down against the tooth.
  • Repeat on the next tooth with a fresh section of the floss until the whole mouth is complete.

Good habits only happen with repeated use. Remember to brush 2 times a day for 2 minutes and floss daily for good dental hygiene.

Flossing is Important – The Choices

Anyone who has ever been to the dentist is aware of the importance of regular flossing. But how many people really do floss as often as they should? Luckily, there are lots of options available. There are more choices than ever on the market and it really doesn’t matter which you choose as long as you get the in-between spaces clean.

Traditional Floss
The “old school” type floss is really a bundle of nylon or plastic filiments, pressed together. It comes in both waxed and non-waxed varieties and is tried and true for cleaning between the teeth. You can also get flavored floss.

Besides getting the job done, regular floss is easy to carry in a purse or pocket or keep in a desk drawer, it’s inexpensive and you don’t need electricity or special equipment to use it.

If you are developing the flossing habit, you might not like traditional floss. It can fray or break, and using it can be difficult if you are not used to it.

Dental Tape
Dental tape works similarly to traditional floss, but is shaped differently. It is more like a ribbon while floss is more like a string. Dental tape tends to be a bit thicker and wider and many people feel it is easier to use. Beginners, especially, tend to prefer dental tape to traditional floss.

People with braces or other dental appliances sometimes find dental tape easier to use as well because the tape does not snag the way regular floss can.

Flossing Aids
Most flossing aids are designed to be used with traditional floss. If controlling the floss with two hands feels awkward and odd to you, you might find a floss holder or stick helpful. Floss holders give you a handle, making it a bit easier to get the floss into your mouth and between your teeth.

You can buy disposable flossers, or you can buy re-usable flossing aids. Some have Teflon coated floss and can be washed and re-used many times.

Floss Threaders are another option for people who have braces, bridges or other dental appliances. The floss threader helps the user get the floss between the teeth gently.

So-called super floss is similar to floss threaders in that it is useful for people who have dental appliances. It has different thicknesses along its length, including a stiff section to help the user get between oral appliances and teeth.

Oral Irrigators
Oral irrigators are possibly the most comfortable and least convenient way to clean between teeth and under the gum line. There are a range of oral irrigators on the market, from those that attach to the faucet, to fancier, standalone models. It is well worth the investment if you hate to floss but don’t mind using the irrigator.

During your next dental appointment be sure to talk to Dr. Brogdon or one of our hygienist to find out more about flossing and their recommendations.

How Important is Flossing?

Every  time you go to the dentist you probably hear about the importance of  flossing.  At Brogdon Dental our hygienist will probably mention it, and Dr. Brogdon will too. We can’t ignore the fact that  flossing is an important component of good oral health.

Yet, people don’t floss. Or, at least, lots of folks don’t. The range  of people who report flossing on a daily basis is somewhere between  10-30%, depending on who you ask. That’s a pretty low percentage. There are plenty of reasons that people give for not flossing, but here are a few good reasons you should:

  • Brushing cleans about 70% of the surface of your teeth. That leaves 30% not being cleaned if you don’t floss.
  • Flossing  prevents tooth decay. There is no doubt, it is proven fact. Cleaning  between the teeth removes bits of food, prevents plaque buildup and  prevents decay.
  • Bad breath is usually preventable, and flossing helps prevent it.
  • Gingivitis can be painful and can lead to worse conditions. Flossing helps prevent it.
  • You only get one set of teeth. Okay, you really get two, but you should still take care of them!

There  are many more options available for flossing than there were even a few  years ago. Experiment and find a method of flossing that you are  comfortable with. Try to incorporate it into your routine at the same  time everyday. Flossing is quick, inexpensive and one of the best things  you can do to keep your teeth healthy.

If you have any questions about flossing, ask Dr. Brogdon or the hygienist on your next visit. You’ll be glad you did!