May is National Smile Month

May 16th begins National Smile Month, a national campaign to promote good oral health in children and adults. Here are some key points from nationalsmilemonth.org to maintain a health smile:

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and on at least one other occasion with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks.
  • Visit your dentist regularly.
  • Change your toothbrush every two to three months or sooner if it becomes worn.
  • Clean in between your teeth at least once a day using floss.
  • If you are nervous about visiting the dentist, make sure they are aware of why so they can improve your treatment.

A great smile can improve your self-confidence, create a positive mind set and can change not only your mouth, but your body too.

BeauBrogdon

We at Brogdon Dental want you to get your smile on. Call us today to make an appointment.

 

 

Smile – it’s back to school time

With a new school year beginning many parents think about new clothes, haircuts or books for their kids, but many forget about their child’s smile. Studies show that one of the first things people notice about you is your smile, and what better way to increase your child’s positive self esteem, than by making sure they have a great smile.

According to knowyourteeth.com:

Seeing a dentist twice a year during the school-age years is vital because this is a time of great change in the mouth, with kids losing baby teeth and getting in their permanent teeth. Tooth decay is still the most common chronic childhood disease and, left untreated, it can impair a child’s ability to eat, speak, sleep and learn. However, studies show more than 60 percent of school-age children do not see a dentist annually.

Start now establishing good dental habits by teaching your children to brush at least twice a day. And don’t forget to floss.  Also make sure you use a toothpaste that contains fluoride and a soft-bristled toothbrush. The sooner you make these habits a priority, the sooner your child will benefit.

Contact our office – Brogdon Dental at 423-870-5698 – to set up your child’a appointment.

 

Pass the Milk, not the Cookies

Did you know that drinking milk may help prevent tooth decay?

“According to a study in The Journal of the American Dental Association, drinking milk after eating sweet foods could help reduce the damage sugar can do to your teeth.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Dentistry tested the effects of drinking milk, apple juice or water on teeth directly after eating a sugary cereal and whether it would affect the acidity of dental plaque.

They found that drinking milk after eating cereal helped lower plaque acid levels the most, followed by water, cereal only and apple juice.”

So encouraging your children to drink milk can help them more than just creating better bones.  It can strengthen their teeth as well.

 

 

Young Children and Tooth Decay

Tooth Decay in younger children has risen to epidemic proportions but it can be prevented.  According to USA Today,

Tooth decay is largely preventable, but it remains one of the most common diseases of childhood — five times as common as asthma, and seven times as common as hay fever, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC says 42% of children ages 2 to 11 have had cavities in baby teeth; 21% of those ages 6 to 11 have had cavities in permanent teeth.

It’s not difficult to get your child to practice good dental hygiene, it just takes time and repetition.  Children should begin early to develop good oral habits.  Here is a list of time guidelines to follow:

Birth to 2 years

• Before teeth erupt, clean baby’s mouth and gums with a soft cloth or infant toothbrush at bath time.

• Once teeth erupt, brush them gently with a soft child’s size toothbrush and a ‘smear’ of fluoridated toothpaste twice a day.

• At bedtime, give nothing but water. Any sugary liquids or carbohydrates (milk, formula, fruit juice) expose teeth to bacterial acid all night long

• Take a child to see a dental provider by his or her first birthday.

2 to 5 years

• Assist or brush your child’s teeth at least twice a day, once in the morning and once at night with a pea-size amount of fluoridated toothpaste. They don’t have the ability to brush effectively alone. They should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing.

• Schedule dental visits every six months for routine cleanings

• Begin flossing a child’s teeth when any two teeth are touching

• Limit the amount of juice you give a child to less than 6 oz. per day.

School-age children

• Parents should supervise their children’s brushing until they are 7 or 8 years old

• Don’t forget to floss their teeth once teeth are touching

• Chewing gum with XYLITOL, a non-sugar naturally occurring substance, to stimulate saliva flow helps clean the mouth (Make sure to ask the teacher first)

• Avoid carbonated beverages, which can erode enamel on teeth; sport drinks and juice pouches keep acid levels high and are also bad for teeth.

Source: American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

BeauBrogdon

It is good for your child to feel comfortable with their dentist and make the experience one that they can look forward to. Contact our office today to set up an appointment for your child to meet Dr Brogdon and our staff.  It’s never too early to begin practicing good dental habits.

National Children’s Dental Health Month

Each February, the American Dental Association sponsors National Children’s Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of oral health. Helping your children develop good habits at an early age and scheduling regular dental visits will give them a good start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

According to the National Education Association (NEA):

Reports show that American students miss 51 million hours of school every year because of oral health problems. And students who are absent miss critical instruction time—especially in early grades where reading skills are an important focus and the building blocks of future learning. And students who have experienced recent oral health pain are four times more likely to have lower grade point averages than their counterparts who have not.

Educating parents to help their children with their oral health is important.  Parents are recommended having their children brush 2 times for 2 minutes per day.  Also to further help their children, the NEA encourages them to read for 20 minutes as a way of building good oral health and literacy habits.  Not only for your children, but parents can also participate by brushing 2 + 2 and reading 20.  By showing your child you are willing to do this, you help them promote good oral health and literacy skills.