Thankful

During this time of the year we are so thankful for our veterans who fought so hard that we would have freedom. We are also thankful for our family and friends, for their love and support. And as always, we at Brogdon Dental are Thankful for all our patients, who we love helping to give them the beautiful smiles they enjoy and deserve. Keep smiling!

Happy Thanksgiving

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F is for Floss

Floss! Is flossing important? Sure it is! Using floss (which is a thin piece of string, usually waxed) between your teeth can help remove food particles and plaque from in between teeth and around your gum line. There are places that your toothbrush just can’t reach and that’s where flossing comes in.

It is recommended that you floss once a day, at bedtime, to help remove what you haven’t been able to do with your toothbrush.  It is really more important than brushing alone.

There are various types of “floss” you can use if you don’t want to use the traditional string floss.  “Dental Flossers” look like a toothpick with a bristled end.  Interdental brushes which are thin, round or cone-shaped, these brushes have a small head with bristles held on by wire and a Water Flosser, which is an oral health appliance designed to removed plaque by the use of jet stream water, such as a WaterPic.

What ever you decide to use, the key is continual use every day. By finding the method best for you, you will be more apt to floss on a daily basis and that’s what’s important.

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E is for Enamel

Have you ever wondered about your tooth enamel. What is it? Should you protect it? Is it important?

Enamel is the hardest material in your body.  It covers the outer layer of your tooth and is what you see when you look at your teeth.   Enamel is made up mostly of minerals, primarily hydroxyapatite.  Hydroxyapatite is defined as a natural calcium mineral and  an essential ingredient of normal bone and teeth. It can be various colors from light yellow to a grayish white.

Enamel is very important in protecting your teeth from decay, so it’s important to do all you can to keep your enamel from eroding.  It helps protect your teeth from sensitive things, such as hot and cold foods or beverages.

Your body cannot make more enamel to replace it if it is destroyed. Enamel does not contain any living cells, so unlike your bones, cannot regenerate. That’s why it’s important to do all you can to protect it.

Avoiding hard candies or those with lots of sugar and high acidic foods are a couple of ways to help.  Also, regular brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing, and visiting Dr. Brogdon for regular cleanings and check ups.

 

D is for Diabetes

So what does diabetes or being a diabetic have to do with your teeth? Plenty!  Almost 30 million in the United States alone suffer from diabetes.  It affects your your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body.

But what about your teeth? You have millions of tiny bacteria that live in your mouth and affect your teeth and gums.  This could result in Periodontal disease, which an inflammatory disease that, left unchecked, can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth and even your bones.

Periodontal disease is one of the more common dental diseases affecting diabetics. Nearly 22% of those diagnosed with diabetes suffer from this gum disease as well. As we age, poor blood sugar control can increase the risk for gum problems. And as with all infections, serious gum disease can cause blood sugar to rise.

So what can you do to prevent this?  Regular visits to your dentist are important.  Research has shown that treating gum disease can help in controlling blood sugar. Practicing good oral hygiene and having cleanings done at your dental office can even help in lowering your A1C numbers.

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According to the American Dental Association, here are some things you can do for a healthier smile:

  • Control your blood sugar levels. Use your diabetes-related medications as directed, changing to a healthier diet and even exercising more can help. Good blood sugar control will also help your body fight any bacterial or fungal infections in your mouth and help relieve dry mouth caused by diabetes.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • If you wear any type of denture, clean it each day.
  • Make sure to brush twice a day with a soft brush and clean between your daily.
  • See your dentist for regular checkups. 

If you suffer from diabetes and haven’t seen us lately, give us a call at 423-870-5698 or email us at brogdondentalpc@gmail comWe are here to help.

C is for Crowns

A crown is a tooth shaped cap used to cover the tooth. It is used to restore the size, shape and strength of the tooth and to improve its appearance.  Once it is cemented in place, it will cover the entire tooth from the gum line.

In some cases a root canal will be required first, especially if the tooth is badly decayed or infected.  During the root canal, the nerve and the pulp are removed and the inside the tooth is cleaned and sealed which will prepare it for the crown.

At Brogdon Dental we offer crowns that can be made in one visit.  With innovative CEREC technology, we can create custom crowns, inlays, and onlays in about an hour. This means that in just one visit, you can get a custom-made, all-white, reliable restoration. No temporary. No follow-up visit. It’s that simple.

 

 

B is for Braces

Braces are used to treat malocclusion (where your teeth are crowded or crooked) or if you have a bad bite. In some case your teeth are not crooked but your upper and lower jaw doesn’t line up correctly.  Whatever the problem, braces may be a good alternative for you.

Many people get braces when they are young.  It’s a good idea for your child to get a dental evaluation by the age of 7 when the adult teeth begin to come in.  The best results are had when started at an early age, but the process usually begins between the ages of 8 and 14.

Even as an adult is is not too late to achieve a better smile.  It may take a little longer, but will be worth the time in the long run.

While you have braces it’s important to eat healthy. By avoiding too much sugary food, you can avoid plaque build-up around your braces that could permanently stain or damage your teeth. Also, foods such as popcorn, corn on the cob, chewing gum, whole apples, and other sticky foods like caramel and candies should not be eaten.

Its’ never too late to achieve the best smile possible.  Call us today to find out more about what braces can do for you or your child.

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A is for Anxiety

Do you dread going to the Dentist? Does your palms start to sweat and your heart starts beating faster when you walk in the door?  Do you find yourself avoiding making an appointment because of your fears?  If this describes you, you are not alone.  Somewhere between 9% and 20% of Americans avoid going to the dentist because of anxiety or fear.

According to WebMD here are some of the most common reasons for dental anxiety:

  • Fear of pain. Fear of pain is a very common reason for avoiding the dentist. This fear usually stems from an early dental experience that was unpleasant or painful or from dental “pain and horror” stories told by others. Thanks to the many advances in dentistry made over the years, most of today’s dental procedures are considerably less painful or even pain-free.
  • Fear of injections or fear the injection won’t work. Many people are terrified of needles, especially when inserted into their mouth. Beyond this fear, others fear that the anesthesia hasn’t yet taken effect or wasn’t a large enough dose to eliminate any pain before the dental procedure begins.
  • Fear of anesthetic side effects. Some people fear the potential side effects of anesthesia such as dizziness, feeling faint, or nausea. Others don’t like the numbness or “fat lip” associated with local anesthetics.
  • Feelings of helplessness and loss of control. It’s common for people to feel these emotions considering the situation — sitting in a dental chair with your mouth wide open, unable to see what’s going on.
  • Embarrassment and loss of personal space. Many people feel uncomfortable about the physical closeness of the dentist or hygienist to their face. Others may feel self-conscious about the appearance of their teeth or possible mouth odors.

If you suffer from any of these anxieties, the best thing you can do is talk about your fears with Dr Brogdon. He can discuss ways to make you feel less stressed and more comfortable.  Ask him to explain all he is doing, when he is doing it.  Knowing what to expect can help you relax. If you have any pain or just need to catch your breath, you might raise your hand or give him some signal to stop what he’s doing.

Dental Anxiety doesn’t have to keep you from having the best smile possible.  We are here to help.  Give us a call and set up that appointment.  Don’t be one of those 20%.