H is for Halitosis

Halitosis, which is the scientific name for bad breath, happens to most all of us at one time or another. So what causes bad breath? Mostly it comes down to bad oral hygiene.

According to a recent article in Medical News Today, potential causes of bad breath can include the following:

  • Tobacco: Tobacco products cause their own types of mouth odor. Additionally, they increase the chances of gum disease which can also cause bad breath.
  • Food: The breakdown of food particles stuck in the teeth can cause odors. Some foods such as onions and garlic can also cause bad breath. After they are digested, their breakdown products are carried in the blood to the lungs where they can affect the breath.
  • Dry mouth: Saliva naturally cleans the mouth. If the mouth is naturally dry or dry due to a specific disease, such as xerostomia,  odors can build up.
  • Dental hygiene: Brushing and flossing ensure the removal of small particles of food that can build up and slowly break down, producing odor. A film of bacteria called plaque builds up if brushing is not regular. This plaque can irritate the gums and cause inflammation between the teeth and gums called periodontitis. Dentures that are not cleaned regularly or properly can also harbor bacteria that cause halitosis.
  • Crash diets: Fasting and low-carbohydrate eating programs can produce halitosis. This is due to the breakdown of fats producing chemicals called ketones. These ketones have a strong aroma.
  • Drugs: Certain medications can reduce saliva and, therefore, increase odors. Other drugs can produce odors as they breakdown and release chemicals in the breath. Examples include nitrates used to treat angina, some chemotherapy chemicals, and some tranquilizers. Individuals who take vitamin supplements in large doses can also be prone to bad breath.
  • Mouth, nose, and throat conditions: Sometimes, small, bacteria-covered stones can form on the tonsils at the back of the throat and produce odor. Also, infections or inflammation in the nose, throat, or sinuses can cause halitosis.
  • Foreign body: Bad breath can be caused if they have a foreign body lodged in their nasal cavity, especially in children.

What can you do to avoid bad breath?  Brush at least twice daily especially after a meal. Floss at least once a day to remove food particles and plaque left after brushing.  Replace your toothbrush every 2 to 3 months. Brush your tongue where bacteria and dead cells  can develop. Drink plenty of water to avoid dry mouth and avoid onion, garlic, spicy and sugary foods that are all linked with bad breath.

Above all, call our office at Brogdon Dental to set up an appoint for your annual cleaning and to discuss your concerns.  We look forward to hearing from you.

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Laughter, the Best Medicine

Today, January 24th, is National Belly Laugh Day! This day is dedicated to the benefits and gift of laughter.  Have you ever been depressed or sad or even in a bad mood about something and started to laugh? Laughter can take the worse day and turn it around. And it’s also good for your heart.

Laughter can boost your immune system and increase your tolerance to pain. Even a smile can make you more positive. A beautiful smile can make you feel better about yourself. And it takes more effort to frown than to smile.

At Brogdon Dental we encourage you to show your beautiful smile and have a belly laugh. You’ll be glad you did. SMILE…

A New Year – Goodbye to 2018

As we approach another new year, we look back on 2018 with thankfulness for all of our family and friends and all the things that happened during those 12 months. The good, the bad and the wonderful!

 

Through it all we would like to especially thank all our patients for using our services this year.  We wouldn’t be here without your support and we at Brogdon Dental just want to wish all of you a fantastic 2019 and remember… Keep Smiling!

We look forward to our continued relationship and seeing you all soon.

HNY2016

G is for Gingivitis

Last month we learned that Flossing was more than just a dance. This month we are going to learn about Gingivitis. So what is Gingivitis? When plaque, which contains bacteria, builds up on teeth it creates an inflammation of the surrounding gum tissue. This gum disease is know as Gingivitis.

Left unchecked, gingivitis can develop into a more severe form of gum disease, known as Periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. In fact, 75% of Americans will experience gum disease at some point in their life.  It is also the number one cause of bleeding gums in adults.

gingivitis-symptoms

According to crest.com here are some steps to help prevent, if you don’t already have gingivitis, or to treat it if you do:

  • Use an anti-gingivitis toothpaste.
  • Use an anti-gingivitis mouthwash.
  • Brush your teeth and gums for at least 2 minutes, at least 2 times a day.
  • Floss at least once a day.
  • Replace your toothbrush every 3 months: Worn-out bristles remove less plaque.
  • If you have sore gums after flossing or brushing, or notice bleeding, don’t stop brushing or flossing. Use a toothbrush with soft bristles so you don’t hurt your gums.  If you notice bleeding regularly, see your dentist.
  • Check your gums in the mirror often for changes in color or texture. If their appearance changes, see your dentist and hygienist.
  • Cut back on foods that are high in sugar. Sugar promotes the growth of gingivitis-causing plaque.

If you feel that you may have gingivitis or even periodontitis, please call call our office at Brogdon Dental as soon as possible so we can begin the process of reversing the problem and restoring healthy gums again.

 

 

F is for Floss

Floss! Is flossing important? Sure it is! Using floss (which is a thin piece of string, usually waxed) between your teeth can help remove food particles and plaque from in between teeth and around your gum line. There are places that your toothbrush just can’t reach and that’s where flossing comes in.

It is recommended that you floss once a day, at bedtime, to help remove what you haven’t been able to do with your toothbrush.  It is really more important than brushing alone.

There are various types of “floss” you can use if you don’t want to use the traditional string floss.  “Dental Flossers” look like a toothpick with a bristled end.  Interdental brushes which are thin, round or cone-shaped, these brushes have a small head with bristles held on by wire and a Water Flosser, which is an oral health appliance designed to removed plaque by the use of jet stream water, such as a WaterPic.

What ever you decide to use, the key is continual use every day. By finding the method best for you, you will be more apt to floss on a daily basis and that’s what’s important.

smallfloss

 

 

E is for Enamel

Have you ever wondered about your tooth enamel. What is it? Should you protect it? Is it important?

Enamel is the hardest material in your body.  It covers the outer layer of your tooth and is what you see when you look at your teeth.   Enamel is made up mostly of minerals, primarily hydroxyapatite.  Hydroxyapatite is defined as a natural calcium mineral and  an essential ingredient of normal bone and teeth. It can be various colors from light yellow to a grayish white.

Enamel is very important in protecting your teeth from decay, so it’s important to do all you can to keep your enamel from eroding.  It helps protect your teeth from sensitive things, such as hot and cold foods or beverages.

Your body cannot make more enamel to replace it if it is destroyed. Enamel does not contain any living cells, so unlike your bones, cannot regenerate. That’s why it’s important to do all you can to protect it.

Avoiding hard candies or those with lots of sugar and high acidic foods are a couple of ways to help.  Also, regular brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing, and visiting Dr. Brogdon for regular cleanings and check ups.