C is for Crowns

A crown is a tooth shaped cap used to cover the tooth. It is used to restore the size, shape and strength of the tooth and to improve its appearance.  Once it is cemented in place, it will cover the entire tooth from the gum line.

In some cases a root canal will be required first, especially if the tooth is badly decayed or infected.  During the root canal, the nerve and the pulp are removed and the inside the tooth is cleaned and sealed which will prepare it for the crown.

At Brogdon Dental we offer crowns that can be made in one visit.  With innovative CEREC technology, we can create custom crowns, inlays, and onlays in about an hour. This means that in just one visit, you can get a custom-made, all-white, reliable restoration. No temporary. No follow-up visit. It’s that simple.

 

 

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Kids and their Teeth

When can you expect your baby’s teeth to first come in?  Generally, the first teeth begin to break through the gums at about 6 months of age.  These are the two bottom front teeth. Then you can expect to see the top four front teeth.  The rest of the teeth (20 at this time will fill in until your child is around 2 -3 years old.

According to WebMD here are some more facts about your baby and their teeth:

  • A general rule of thumb is that for every 6 months of life, approximately 4 teeth will erupt.
  • Girls generally precede boys in tooth eruption.
  • Lower teeth usually erupt before upper teeth.
  • Teeth in both jaws usually erupt in pairs — one on the right and one on the left.
  • Primary teeth are smaller in size and whiter in color than the permanent teeth that will follow.
  • By the time a child is 2 to 3 years of age, all primary teeth should have erupted.

By the ages of 6 and 12, a mixture of both primary teeth and permanent teeth will be in their mouth.

Even though they will only have their baby teeth for a short time, they serve an important purpose in your child’s dental development. Baby teeth…

  • Reserve space for their permanent counterparts
  • Give the face its normal appearance.
  • Aid in the development of clear speech.
  • Help attain good nutrition (missing or decayed teeth make it difficult to chew, causing children to reject foods)
  • Help give a healthy start to the permanent teeth (decay and infection in baby teeth can cause damage to the permanent teeth developing beneath them).

It’s important to set up a dental appointment soon after their teeth start coming in.  Call us today. 423-870-5698. Your kids will love it!

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Calcium and your Teeth

pexels-photo-236010.jpegI know many will remember your Mom saying to you “Drink your milk, it’s helps you build strong bones”… But what about your teeth? Will milk help them as well?  Calcium is one of the most important nutrients to help keep your teeth healthy.

The American Dental Association recommends that the average adult consume between 1,000 and 2,000 mg of calcium on a daily basis to maintain optimum tooth and enamel health. Consuming a diet high in calcium helps to fortify enamel, so teeth are less likely to break.

So what foods are a good source of calcium?

  • Leafy Greens such as spinach or turnip greens contain over 250 mg per cup.
  • Canned Fish are high in calcium especially if the soft bones are included.
  • Fortified Cereals, especially those containing almonds.
  • Tofu,  just a half cup of tofu contains 253 mg of calcium. Remember, it takes on the flavor of whatever you’re cooking.
  • Orange Juice that is calcium fortified. Although it may be acidic, can give you your daily requirement of calcium.

Remember these foods and add some calcium in your diet. Not only is it good for your bones but your teeth as well.

 

March National Nutrition Month

When it comes to proper nutrition, every thing you eat counts. That’s why it’s important to look at all the things you eat to determine if it’s good or bad for your teeth.

Your mouth, teeth and gums, used in chewing and swallowing, are the first steps in the digestion process. This begins the process of delivering nutrients into the body. In addition, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.

Begin now learning to eat a well-balanced diet so that your body can get the nutrients needed for good health and wellness. If your body is low in the proper nutrients,  you may have a hard time fighting infections. A poor diet can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. Carbohydrates, sugars and starches help produce plaque acids that attack the tooth enamel, destroying teeth. Also, too much of these can lead to diabetes, heart disease, or even stroke.  Remember to read the labels on every food you purchase.

In order to maintain a balanced diet, try to eat a variety of foods from each of the five major food groups. Stay away from empty calorie foods and those high in sugar.  Choose a healthy stack such as cheese, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, almonds, or a piece of fruit.

Remember to watch what you eat and call us twice a year for your dental check up.

 

February Heart Month

Since February is known as Heart Month is there a relationship between your oral health and your heart health?

Heart Disease is defined as cardiovascular disease, and occurs when blood vessels either narrow or become completely blocked, a condition that can lead to a heart attack, stroke or chest pain.  So what does this have to do with your Oral Health?

Recent studies show that if you have gum disease in a moderate or advanced stage, you’re at greater risk for heart disease than someone with healthy gums.

According to colgate.com, patients with chronic gum conditions such as gingivitis or advanced periodontal disease have the highest risk for heart disease caused by poor oral health, particularly if it remains undiagnosed and unmanaged. The bacteria that are associated with gum infection are in the mouth and can enter the blood stream, where they attach to the blood vessels and increase your risk to cardiovascular disease. 

So what should you do? Regular dental exams and good oral hygiene are two ways to protect yourself against developing gum disease. Visit our office at Brogdon Dental for regular professional teeth cleanings.  We want to keep your heart and your smile healthy as well as beautiful!

Wine – Good for your Breath?

Recent studies have shown that drinking wine may protect teeth by destroying bacteria that cause cavities, halitosis (bad breath) and periodontitis. According to DailyMail.com  Studies suggests antioxidants in wine significantly prevent bacteria that cause plaque, cavities and periodontal disease from sticking to gums.

But what kind of wine is best?   Research shows that antioxidants in red wine are more effective against plaque-causing bacteria that sticks to gum tissue, and when the bacteria is destroyed, your breath will reflect it.  Tests revealed two red wine ingredients – caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid – stopped tooth destroying bacteria from contaminating the mouth. Also red wine contains polyphenols, which can also help protect against heart disease and cancer.

Over-drinking though doesn’t have the same healthy benefits.  You should limited your consumption to one to two glasses of wine per day since too much wine can cause damage to the enamel on your teeth.

So Cheers! And remember to call Brogdon Dental for your next dental appointment.

 

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Is there any “Good” Candy?

Around this time of the year, we are often asked this question… Is there any good candy?  Obviously, most sugar coated candies are bad for your teeth. Especially candies that stick to your teeth when you eat them.  That not only includes candies but dried fruits as well which are full of sugars.  Also lollipops are bad because they take so long to eat which allows the sugars to stay in your mouth for a longer time.

But are there any sugars that can be considered good for you?  Dark Chocolate has many attributes that make it a good choice.  Several studies have shown that it may be just as effective than fluoride in fighting tooth decay. Also, compounds in cocoa beans have an antibacterial effect that fights plaque. It also helps your heart too.

 

Since sugar feeds bacteria in your mouth, sugarless gum and candies are an alternative to sugar laced candies. Also choose a “candy bar” with lots of nuts which serve to break up the stickiness of most bars.  When choosing a bar, why not pick a protein bar with more nuts and dark chocolate and less sticky sugars such as caramels.

Be sure to read the labels for the sugar content and avoid anything with high fructose corn syrup.