D is for Diabetes

So what does diabetes or being a diabetic have to do with your teeth? Plenty!  Almost 30 million in the United States alone suffer from diabetes.  It affects your your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body.

But what about your teeth? You have millions of tiny bacteria that live in your mouth and affect your teeth and gums.  This could result in Periodontal disease, which an inflammatory disease that, left unchecked, can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth and even your bones.

Periodontal disease is one of the more common dental diseases affecting diabetics. Nearly 22% of those diagnosed with diabetes suffer from this gum disease as well. As we age, poor blood sugar control can increase the risk for gum problems. And as with all infections, serious gum disease can cause blood sugar to rise.

So what can you do to prevent this?  Regular visits to your dentist are important.  Research has shown that treating gum disease can help in controlling blood sugar. Practicing good oral hygiene and having cleanings done at your dental office can even help in lowering your A1C numbers.

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According to the American Dental Association, here are some things you can do for a healthier smile:

  • Control your blood sugar levels. Use your diabetes-related medications as directed, changing to a healthier diet and even exercising more can help. Good blood sugar control will also help your body fight any bacterial or fungal infections in your mouth and help relieve dry mouth caused by diabetes.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • If you wear any type of denture, clean it each day.
  • Make sure to brush twice a day with a soft brush and clean between your daily.
  • See your dentist for regular checkups. 

If you suffer from diabetes and haven’t seen us lately, give us a call at 423-870-5698 or email us at brogdondentalpc@gmail comWe are here to help.

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Dental Care and Diabetes

Did you know that over 29 million people today are affected by diabetes?  Diabetes can affect the whole body including your mouth.  Proper Dental care is  important for people with diabetes because they face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems due to poorly controlled blood sugars.

So what can you do if you have diabetes to insure good oral health? Here are some day to day dental heath care tips courtesy of  webmd.com:

  • Have your teeth and gums cleaned and checked by your dentist twice a year. (Your dentist may recommend a closer interval depending upon your condition.)
  • Prevent plaque buildup on teeth by using dental floss at least once a day.
  • Brush your teeth after every meal. The best time is at least 30 minutes after eating to allow re-mineralization of any enamel that had been softened by acid in the food. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush.
  • If you wear dentures, remove them and clean them daily. Do not sleep in them.
  • If you smoke, talk to your doctor about ways to quit.
  • Antibacterial mouth rinses can reduce bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease, according to the American Dental Association.

Contact our office at Brogdon Dental for more information or to schedule an appointment.

Dry Mouth?

Do you or someone you know suffer from dry mouth?  If so you might want to contact our office.

According to caring.com, there are many reasons for a dry mouth, some worse than others…

Many things can cause dry mouth, from dehydration and allergies to smoking and new medications. (In fact, hundreds of drugs list dry mouth as a side effect, including those to treat depression and incontinence, muscle relaxants, anti-anxiety agents, and antihistamines.) But a lack of sufficient saliva is also an early warning of two autoimmune diseases unrelated to medicine use: Sjogren’s syndrome and diabetes.

In Sjogren’s, the white blood cells of the body attack their moisture-producing glands, for unknown reasons. Four million Americans have Sjogren’s, 90 percent of them women. Twenty-four million people in the U.S. have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disease caused by high blood sugar.

What else to look for: Other signs of diabetes include excessive thirst, tingling in the hands and feet, frequent urination, blurred vision, and weight loss. In Sjogren’s, the eyes are dry as well as the mouth, but the entire body is affected by the disorder. Because its symptoms mimic other diseases (such as diabetes), people are often misdiagnosed and go several years before being properly diagnosed.

If you have any of these symptoms, call our office at Brogdon Dental. We can can check your mouth and see if you might be suffering from any of these problems.  Don’t put it off, call today.

Dental Care and Diabetes

Many people do not associate diabetes with dental care, but if you suffer from diabetes you need to take special care of your teeth and gums.

According to Web MD, “Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body, including your mouth. Dental care is particularly important for people with diabetes because they face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems due to poorly controlled blood sugars. The less well controlled the blood sugar, the more likely oral health problems will arise. This is because uncontrolled diabetes impairs white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth.”

People with diabetes face a higher risk of:

  • Dry mouth. Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay.
  • Gum inflammation (gingivitis and periodontitis). Besides impairing white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken, which slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events happens, the body’s ability to fight infections is reduced. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, diabetics with uncontrolled disease may experience more frequent and more severe gum disease.
  • Poor healing of oral tissues. People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be impaired.
  • Thrush. People with diabetes who frequently take antibiotics to fight various infections are especially prone to developing a fungal infection of the mouth and tongue. The fungus thrives on the high levels of sugar in the saliva of people with uncontrolled diabetes.
  • Burning mouth and/or tongue. This condition is caused by the presence of thrush.

Here are some oral health tips from Web MD:

Day-to-Day Dental Health Care Tips

  • Have your teeth and gums cleaned and checked by your dentist twice a year. (Your dentist may recommend a closer interval depending upon your condition.)
  • Prevent plaque buildup on teeth by using dental floss at least once a day.
  • Brush your teeth after every meal. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush.
  • If you wear dentures, remove them and clean them daily.
  • If you smoke, talk to your doctor about ways to quit.
  • dental-health-dental-care-diabetes

Antibacterial mouth rinses can reduce bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease, according to the American Dental Association.

It is essential that you follow good dental health practices, especially if you suffer from diabetes.  Dr. Brogdon needs to be aware of your condition as well.  Notify our office immediately in the event of any changes in your mouth, gums or teeth. We are concerned about your dental care and know you are too!