B is for Braces

Braces are used to treat malocclusion (where your teeth are crowded or crooked) or if you have a bad bite. In some case your teeth are not crooked but your upper and lower jaw doesn’t line up correctly.  Whatever the problem, braces may be a good alternative for you.

Many people get braces when they are young.  It’s a good idea for your child to get a dental evaluation by the age of 7 when the adult teeth begin to come in.  The best results are had when started at an early age, but the process usually begins between the ages of 8 and 14.

Even as an adult is is not too late to achieve a better smile.  It may take a little longer, but will be worth the time in the long run.

While you have braces it’s important to eat healthy. By avoiding too much sugary food, you can avoid plaque build-up around your braces that could permanently stain or damage your teeth. Also, foods such as popcorn, corn on the cob, chewing gum, whole apples, and other sticky foods like caramel and candies should not be eaten.

Its’ never too late to achieve the best smile possible.  Call us today to find out more about what braces can do for you or your child.

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A is for Anxiety

Do you dread going to the Dentist? Does your palms start to sweat and your heart starts beating faster when you walk in the door?  Do you find yourself avoiding making an appointment because of your fears?  If this describes you, you are not alone.  Somewhere between 9% and 20% of Americans avoid going to the dentist because of anxiety or fear.

According to WebMD here are some of the most common reasons for dental anxiety:

  • Fear of pain. Fear of pain is a very common reason for avoiding the dentist. This fear usually stems from an early dental experience that was unpleasant or painful or from dental “pain and horror” stories told by others. Thanks to the many advances in dentistry made over the years, most of today’s dental procedures are considerably less painful or even pain-free.
  • Fear of injections or fear the injection won’t work. Many people are terrified of needles, especially when inserted into their mouth. Beyond this fear, others fear that the anesthesia hasn’t yet taken effect or wasn’t a large enough dose to eliminate any pain before the dental procedure begins.
  • Fear of anesthetic side effects. Some people fear the potential side effects of anesthesia such as dizziness, feeling faint, or nausea. Others don’t like the numbness or “fat lip” associated with local anesthetics.
  • Feelings of helplessness and loss of control. It’s common for people to feel these emotions considering the situation — sitting in a dental chair with your mouth wide open, unable to see what’s going on.
  • Embarrassment and loss of personal space. Many people feel uncomfortable about the physical closeness of the dentist or hygienist to their face. Others may feel self-conscious about the appearance of their teeth or possible mouth odors.

If you suffer from any of these anxieties, the best thing you can do is talk about your fears with Dr Brogdon. He can discuss ways to make you feel less stressed and more comfortable.  Ask him to explain all he is doing, when he is doing it.  Knowing what to expect can help you relax. If you have any pain or just need to catch your breath, you might raise your hand or give him some signal to stop what he’s doing.

Dental Anxiety doesn’t have to keep you from having the best smile possible.  We are here to help.  Give us a call and set up that appointment.  Don’t be one of those 20%.

Kids and their Teeth

When can you expect your baby’s teeth to first come in?  Generally, the first teeth begin to break through the gums at about 6 months of age.  These are the two bottom front teeth. Then you can expect to see the top four front teeth.  The rest of the teeth (20 at this time will fill in until your child is around 2 -3 years old.

According to WebMD here are some more facts about your baby and their teeth:

  • A general rule of thumb is that for every 6 months of life, approximately 4 teeth will erupt.
  • Girls generally precede boys in tooth eruption.
  • Lower teeth usually erupt before upper teeth.
  • Teeth in both jaws usually erupt in pairs — one on the right and one on the left.
  • Primary teeth are smaller in size and whiter in color than the permanent teeth that will follow.
  • By the time a child is 2 to 3 years of age, all primary teeth should have erupted.

By the ages of 6 and 12, a mixture of both primary teeth and permanent teeth will be in their mouth.

Even though they will only have their baby teeth for a short time, they serve an important purpose in your child’s dental development. Baby teeth…

  • Reserve space for their permanent counterparts
  • Give the face its normal appearance.
  • Aid in the development of clear speech.
  • Help attain good nutrition (missing or decayed teeth make it difficult to chew, causing children to reject foods)
  • Help give a healthy start to the permanent teeth (decay and infection in baby teeth can cause damage to the permanent teeth developing beneath them).

It’s important to set up a dental appointment soon after their teeth start coming in.  Call us today. 423-870-5698. Your kids will love it!

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Calcium and your Teeth

pexels-photo-236010.jpegI know many will remember your Mom saying to you “Drink your milk, it’s helps you build strong bones”… But what about your teeth? Will milk help them as well?  Calcium is one of the most important nutrients to help keep your teeth healthy.

The American Dental Association recommends that the average adult consume between 1,000 and 2,000 mg of calcium on a daily basis to maintain optimum tooth and enamel health. Consuming a diet high in calcium helps to fortify enamel, so teeth are less likely to break.

So what foods are a good source of calcium?

  • Leafy Greens such as spinach or turnip greens contain over 250 mg per cup.
  • Canned Fish are high in calcium especially if the soft bones are included.
  • Fortified Cereals, especially those containing almonds.
  • Tofu,  just a half cup of tofu contains 253 mg of calcium. Remember, it takes on the flavor of whatever you’re cooking.
  • Orange Juice that is calcium fortified. Although it may be acidic, can give you your daily requirement of calcium.

Remember these foods and add some calcium in your diet. Not only is it good for your bones but your teeth as well.

 

March National Nutrition Month

When it comes to proper nutrition, every thing you eat counts. That’s why it’s important to look at all the things you eat to determine if it’s good or bad for your teeth.

Your mouth, teeth and gums, used in chewing and swallowing, are the first steps in the digestion process. This begins the process of delivering nutrients into the body. In addition, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.

Begin now learning to eat a well-balanced diet so that your body can get the nutrients needed for good health and wellness. If your body is low in the proper nutrients,  you may have a hard time fighting infections. A poor diet can lead to gum disease and tooth decay. Carbohydrates, sugars and starches help produce plaque acids that attack the tooth enamel, destroying teeth. Also, too much of these can lead to diabetes, heart disease, or even stroke.  Remember to read the labels on every food you purchase.

In order to maintain a balanced diet, try to eat a variety of foods from each of the five major food groups. Stay away from empty calorie foods and those high in sugar.  Choose a healthy stack such as cheese, raw vegetables, plain yogurt, almonds, or a piece of fruit.

Remember to watch what you eat and call us twice a year for your dental check up.

 

Children and Teeth

So when do your baby teeth come in? Surprisingly your teeth begin forming before you are born. The first baby tooth can appear through the gums as early as four months. All 20 of the primary teeth usually appear by age three. By the time you are six, your permanent teeth should begin to appear.  At age 21 you should have all your permanent teeth.

According to oralb.com here are some problems to look for in the development of your child’s teeth and how to address them:

Baby Teeth Problems

  • Baby Bottle Tooth Decay:  To avoid this common problem, wipe gums with gauze or a clean washcloth and water after feeding. When teeth appear, brush daily with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Also remember to put the child to bed with a bottle of water instead of milk or juice.
  • Thumb Sucking:  The catchall term for the various oral sucking habits of children is “non-nutritive sucking.” This includes thumb or finger sucking and the use of pacifiers. Most contemporary pediatric health providers agree that these habits have important formative and nurturing functions and, at least for the first few years of life (up until about age four), should be ignored. There is, however, universal agreement that sucking should cease before permanent teeth begin to appear. Consult your dentist on your child’s sucking habits.
  • White Spots on Teeth:  As soon as the first tooth appears, usually at about six months, begin cleaning your child’s teeth daily and schedule a dental appointment.

If your toddler has never been to the dentist, have them sit in your lap during the exam to make them feel more at ease.  If you make this visit a family routine, your child will look forward to their dental visits.

At Brogdon Dental we want your child to feel comfortable in order to create an atmosphere for a life long experience. Call us today to set up your first appointment.

Why Regular Dental Checkups are Essential

It’s important to schedule regular dental checkups. The ADA recommends that you see your dentist every six months.  During this time the dentist (or dental hygienist) will probably evaluate the health of your gums, perform a head and neck examination and examine your mouth for any signs of oral cancer, diabetes or vitamin deficiencies.

Don’t be surprises if your dentist checks for plaque and tartar build up.  One of the reasons we have you come so often is that plaque and tartar can build up quickly if good oral hygiene is not practiced at home. This plaque can lead to gum disease.

Here is a list of some of the things the dentist will look for during your examination:

  • Examine your gums
  • Will look for signs of gum disease.
  • Check for loose teeth
  • Examine your tongue
  • Check your bite
  • Look for visual evidence of tooth decay
  • Check for broken teeth
  • Check for damaged fillings
  • Look for changes in the gums covering teeth
  • Evaluate your dental appliances
  • Check the contact between your teeth
  • Take X-rays

The trip to the dentist doesn’t have to be a bad experience.  We at Brogdon Dental want to make sure you have as enjoyable experience as possible.  Call us today to schedule your Checkup. Hopefully you will see how essential it can be.