April Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Since over 45,000 people will be diagnosed with oral or throat cancer this year, we urge you to see us if you haven’t had a dental exam in a while.  When cancer is detected and treated early, treatment-related health problems can be reduced.

Regular oral cancer examinations can help detect oral cancer in its early stages. Dental visits can improve the chances that any suspicious changes in your oral health will be caught early, at a time when cancer can be treated more easily.

According to the American Dental Association here is a list of signs and symptoms you should be aware of in relation to your oral health, especially if they last more than two weeks:

  • a sore or irritation that doesn’t go away
  • red or white patches
  • pain, tenderness or numbness in mouth or lips
  • a lump, thickening, rough spot, crust or small eroded area
  • difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking, or moving your jaw or tongue
  • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you close your mouth

If you notice any of these changes, please call our office immediately to set up an appointment.  Don’t ignore any suspicious lumps or sores that last more than two weeks. Prompt examination could make a difference.

April Oral Cancer Month

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month and we urge you to get examined today.  Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (cancer of the mouth and upper throat) collectively kill nearly one person every hour of every day of the year. The death rate for these cancers are high because they are usually detected too late.  When detected early, the mortality rate for many of these cancers can be reduced.

Here are some symptoms to look for according to the American Academy of Oral Medicine.

Your mouth is one of your body’s most important early warning systems. In between dental visits, it is important for patients to be aware of the following signs and symptoms, and to see a dental professional if they do not improve or disappear after two-three weeks:

  • a sore, or soreness or irritation that doesn’t go away
  • red or white patches, or pain, tenderness, or numbness in mouth or lips
  • lumps, thickening tissues, rough spots, crusty or eroded areas
  • difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking, or moving your jaw or tongue
  • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you close your mouth

When it comes to symptoms, keep this two-three week time period in mind, but always call your dentist right away if you have any immediate concerns. Be aware of the symptoms and risk factors of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Early detection and treatment may well be the key to a complete recovery.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, please call our office at Brogdon Dental today and let us schedule an appointment for you. Don’t wait.

April – Oral Cancer Awareness Month

April is National Oral Cancer Awareness Month and many pre-cancer and cancers can be found early during your routine dental examination. Unfortunately though, some cancers may not cause symptoms at all until they’ve reached an advanced stage, or they may cause symptoms similar to those caused by a disease other than cancer, such as a toothache. Many dentist recommend you routinely check your mouth for sores or anything unusual.

Some factors that can contribute to your increased risk of Oral Cancer include:

  • Tobacco use of any kind, including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco and snuff, among others
  •  Heavy alcohol use
  • Previous oral cancer diagnosis

If you have any of these factors or have found an unusual sore or lesion in your mouth, please let us know.  Dr. Brogdon may want to perform an Oral Cancer Examination.  The American Dental Association recommends all adults undergo periodic oral exams when they visit the dentist.

Remember you may not always experience any pain until later stages. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Call today to set up your appointment.

April National Oral Cancer Month

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation website:

“You are the most important factor in an early diagnosis. You should always contact your doctor or dentist immediately if you notice the following symptoms in yourself or a loved one:

  • A sore or lesion in the mouth that does not heal within two weeks.
  • A lump or thickening in the cheek.
  • A white or red patch on the gums, tongue, tonsil, or lining of the mouth.
  • A sore throat or a feeling that something is caught in the throat.
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing.
  • Difficulty moving the jaw or tongue.
  • Numbness of the tongue or other area of the mouth.
  • Swelling of the jaw that causes dentures to fit poorly or become uncomfortable.
  • Chronic hoarseness.

These symptoms may be caused by other, less serious problems, but they also indicate the possible presence of oral cancer. Only a professional will be able to tell you definitively. Some think that a visit to their medical doctor is the appropriate course of action. But remember that dentists are trained in this simple, quick screening, which involves the examination of the oral cavity as a whole and not just your teeth.”

————————————

“Not only do regular dental exams help keep your teeth and gums healthy, they can help detect oral cancer, the Academy of General Dentistry says.

As part of Oral Cancer Awareness Month in April, the group recommends that people get a dental exam from a general dentist every six months.

“The next time you visit your dentist, ask about an oral cancer screening,” academy spokesperson Dr. Seung-Hee Rhee advised in an academy news release.

“Your dentist will feel for lumps or irregular tissue changes in your neck, head, cheeks, and oral cavity and thoroughly examine the soft tissues in your mouth, specifically looking for any sores or discolored tissues. Although you may have already been receiving this screening from your dentist, it’s a good idea to confirm that this screening is a part, and will remain a part, of your regular exam,” Rhee said.

Each year in the United States, more than 30,000 new cases of oral cancer are diagnosed, and more than 8,000 people die of the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” (courtesy of http://www.healthday.com)

Make an appointment today to see Dr Brogdon and ask for an Oral Cancer Screening.