Toothpaste in History

Last time we discussed the history of the toothbrush, but have you ever wondered about the toothpaste you use?  Apparently toothpaste has been around for a long time in some shape or fashion, longer in fact than the toothbrush. The first formula for toothpaste was created by, you guess it, the Egyptians, in 5000 BC.  A concoction made up of crushed rock salt, mint, dried iris flowers and pepper, were mixed together which created a powder, when mixed with water, was used in cleaning teeth. Also a power of crusted oyster shells and bones was often used. But let’s not forget the ancient Greeks and Romans, who used a powder made up of ashes of ox hooves and burned eggshells and added more flavoring to help with bad breath, as well as powdered charcoal and bark.

According to spearseducation.com, here are some important dates in the history of toothpaste:

1780: People were known to scrub their teeth with a powder that was made up of mainly burnt bread. That’s right – what a lot of us eat for breakfast was once considered an effective solution for clean and healthy teeth.

1824: A dentist named Peabody added soap to toothpaste for added cleanliness. Soap was later replaced by sodium lauryn sulfate to create a smooth paste.

1873: The first commercially produced, nice-smelling toothpaste was launched by Colgate and sold in a jar.

1892: Dr. Washington Sheffield is the first person to put toothpaste in a collapsible tube. It has been suggested that this version of toothpaste is the most similar to today’s version.

1914:  Fluoride is added to toothpastes after discovering it significantly decreased dental cavities.

1975: Herbal toothpastes, such as Tom’s, becomes available as an alternative to cleaning teeth without fluoride. These toothpastes include ingredients like peppermint oil, myrrh and plant extracts.

1987: Edible toothpaste is invented. What is mainly used by children just learning to brush their teeth was actually invented by NASA so astronauts could brush their teeth without spitting into a zero-gravity abyss.

1989: Rembrandt invented the first toothpaste that claimed to whiten and brighten your smile.

The toothpastes we find today typically contain fluoride, coloring, flavoring, sweetener, as well as ingredients that make the toothpaste a smooth paste, foam and stay moist. Toothpaste in a tube, is used throughout the world.

Maybe it’s taken 5000 years, but dental care has improved as well as the taste of your toothpaste.

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss – and a Fork 11

Today we are going to talk about Onions. Onions you might ask? How can that help your teeth besides giving you bad breath? But onions have medicinal purposes too.

Your grandmother may not have known why onions relieve toothaches, but she knew that it would help when she put a piece on a painful tooth or gum.

Onions contain vitamin C as well as antibacterial compounds like quercetin and isothiocyanates, according to research by the NIH. These plant-based antioxidants reduce bacteria and relieve inflammation.

onions

So next time you order a hamburger, don’t forget the onions. Not only do they taste good, but can help with any inflammation you might be experiencing.

And don’t forget to call us at Brogdon Dental for all your dental needs 423-870-5698.

 

 

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss – and a Fork 9

Last time we discussed foods, we talked about nuts and the benefits of eating more almonds, but today we’ll talk about something to drink… tea!  We discussed coffee before, but did you know that tea has some dental benefits too?

Not only can a cup of tea soothe your nerves, but it’s good for healthy teeth. Black or green tea is a rich source of micro nutrients that reduce gum disease and prevent cavities, according to a 2004 Rutgers University study. Researchers showed antioxidants in green tea, called catechins, reduce gum inflammation.

While some avoid tea for fear of staining teeth, black tea contains polyphenols that produce a protective film that coats and shields teeth from cavity-causing bacteria.

So sit down, brew a cup of tea, and relax. Your teeth and your nerves will thank you!

tea