Sports and Mouthguards

It’s High School Sports time! With school starting back again, sports, such as football and basketball, will be in full swing.  Since dental injuries are common in collision or contact sports and recreational activities, a properly fitted mouthguard or mouth protector in all contact sports are recommend. If you participate in team sports or other activities with risks of injury to the teeth, jaw and oral soft tissues (such as the mouth, lip, tongue, or inner lining of the cheeks) we recommend you use a  mouthguard, especially in any sporting or recreational activity.

Studies of mouthguard users and nonusers have shown that mouthguards offer significant protection against sports-related injuries to the teeth and soft tissues.

“According to a 2007 meta-analysis of studies evaluating the effectiveness of mouthguards in reducing injuries, the overall injury risk was found to be 1.6-1.9 times greater when a mouthguard was not worn, relative to when mouthguards were used during athletic activity. Another study of collegiate basketball teams found that athletes wearing custom-made mouthguards sustained significantly fewer dental injuries than those who did not.

For sporting activities that are inherently contact-oriented (e.g., football), orofacial protectors or faceguards are also appropriate for added safety and protection. The ADA has endorsed the preventive value of orofacial protectors, including helmets, faceguards and mouth protectors, for use by participants in sporting and recreational activities with some degree of injury risk and at all levels of competition.” (according to the American Dental Association)

A mouthguard is an essential piece of athletic gear that should be part of your standard equipment. Talk to Dr Brogdon about selecting a mouthguard that will offer you the best protection. Your smile may depend upon it.

 

 

 

Cracked or Crumbling Teeth

Have you noticed your teeth cracking or do they seem to be crumbling?  Older adults seem to be vulnerable to teeth that appear to be cracking or crumbling away. The enamel becomes thin and almost translucent. But this erosion isn’t necessarily a normal consequence of aging. In fact, it can happen at any age.

This condition can be caused by acid coming up from the stomach and dissolving your teeth. The cause of this is know as GERD or Gastroesophageal reflux disease (also called acid reflux disease). GERD causes stomach acid to back up into the esophagus — and from there, it’s a short distance to the mouth for some of the damaging acid. GERD is a chronic disorder caused by damage or other changes to the natural barrier between the stomach and the esophagus.

You may also experience dry mouth and or heartburn, as these are also symptoms of GERD. Cracked or chipped teeth in a younger person can be a sign of bulimia, an eating disorder in which stomach acids can wash over the teeth and over time destroys the enamel.

If you think you may be suffering from cracked or crumbling teeth and you’re not sure why, give us a call.  We can help determine what your problems is and if we can help. Don’t suffer from tooth loss if there is something that can be done.